Went into the eye of the storm

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Michbeeman63, May 11, 2012.

  1. Michbeeman63

    Michbeeman63 New Member

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    I went to inspect my hive that I split about 10 days ago. I supered it when I did the split. the hive was nasty when I split it and worse when I went into inspect. :mad: The hive had 5 frames removed and 5 new ones replacing them. they are not fully drawn out yet, but they are on their way. Wanted to see if there was any eggs in the new comb. Didn't see any but was not able to make a good inspection since the bees were in a tizzy. Wanted to see if I hadn't removed the queen with the split. Had at least 100 bees stinging me on each hand. Had to turn the hose on my gloves to get the bees to calm. Don't see myself going into the brood chamber again.

    what would make this hive so aggressive. It wasn't that bad last year. It seemed to get more aggressive in the fall last year but now it is game on even with smoke. I don't think I could find the queen to requeen with all the aggressiveness. Would like to pinch that broad though.

    When is the best time to requeen? this is a 2nd year hive. Would like to get some honey since this hive is very strong.

    any help is appreciated.
     
  2. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    now is a wonderful time, if the girls are as miserable as you describe, defensiveness like that should not be tolerated colony strength will not diminish if you re-queen, actually should stay or get stronger. It will take around 40 to 60 days to see a total change in temperament, a marked difference within a month. Ohh yeah, expect a severe tattooing when you start seriously looking for the queen.
    Barry
     

  3. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I like to use the following regime for an aggressive hive.

    A day or two before the examination I move the hive to a new stand a few yards away. I put an empty box on the original stand. When you go to look for the Q, hopefully all the flying and guard bees will be back on the old stand and the examination will be easier.

    .
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    I went to inspect my hive that I split about 10 days ago. I supered it when I did the split.

    tecumseh:
    from the day you made the split you should 'expect' to see a queen about 30 days later (I assume you expect them to make a cell and did not introduce a laying queen at the time of splitting). I am not certain why you added space at the time of splitting.... just sounds a bit contrary to how I do things here.

    at least one part of the split is now queenless and you would expect them to be a bit hostile to your intrusions. Hives that are queenless or experiencing queen problem (for example the existing queens pattern is getting lousy) and hungry bees are two prime reason that hive become nervous and very defensive.
     
  5. Michbeeman63

    Michbeeman63 New Member

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    I left the queen with the original hive, at least that was my intention. My new nuc had a new queen introduced. When I removed 5 frames from the original hive, I replaced them with empty frames. Would you do otherwise? They would build burr comb if I left them out.

    I looked at the nuc several times before the new queen released and did not see a queen so I was reasonably confident my original hive still had the queen, but wanted to see any evidence of a queen laying eggs.

    Guess at this point, my choices are to let it go and not interrupt this seemingly very strong hive in the name of honey or try to requeen and chance messing it up. Even if I did remove the queen with the split, the hive should be working on a new queen anyway, right? Unfortunately, a new queen in this way would have a similar temperment to the one now.

    still learning, and hope to introduce the nuc into a deep this week since we are hopefully past any real cold weather here in Michigan.
     
  6. Michbeeman63

    Michbeeman63 New Member

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    what is the process once the nasty one is pinched. Do I leave the hive queenless for a few days so they realize the old one is gone, and they accept the new one? That means I have to go into the eye of the storm more than once. Don't know why this worries me since I didn't take any stings wearing two gloves but there were at least 100 stingers on the gloves from my brief inspection.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    ""I went to inspect my hive that I split about 10 days ago. I supered it when I did the split.""

    Normally, supering means more than replacing removed frames. I think that is what Tec is referring to.

    When requeening, the bees will know they are queenless within minutes of removing the old queen. Most beeks wait an hour or two, or even overnight. I don't. I add the new queen in a cage within minutes of killing the old one.

    If I let the split raise a new queen, I go into it after 5 to 8 days to ensure I have queen cells. Then I have a much better idea if it is going to work.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    yes Iddee has that exactly correct. I introduce queens like Iddee describes...

    I myself don't like to give a split long enough to start a bunch of cells which just seem to me to make getting the queen out of their cages and laying much more difficult.