What about this plan for splits

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I have 3 hives that are great. They all 3 are very nice and queens lay a great pattern. I have just extracted everything above the first super. Got about 14 gallons and have put the empty supers back on the hives. These 3 hives are sitting in the middle of hundreds and hundreds if not thousands of acres of soybeans. The soybeans are gonna start blooming in a few weeks. Then after that, will be fall stuff, golden rod etc.

    I am thinking of finding these 3 queens and moving them with some empty comb, brood and honey to nucs and bringing them back home to start new colonies. These big hives are full of bees and brood. Leave the big hives to requeen themselves during the soy bean flow and have a good laying queen (hopefully) for the fall flow and winter.

    What do you think about this plan and timing, with what they have fixing to start blooming.
     
  2. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    How long do soybeans bloom? Seems to me like that will be your most important honey production for the year. You want to make sure that your colonies will be at full strength throughout that flow. If you remove the queens now, you will see a dip in young bee population starting in about 3 weeks, and a sharp dip in forager population in about 6 weeks. So if you think that the soybeans will flower say in three weeks, and continue to bloom for three weeks, then your honey production should not be impacted. If you think the flow might start later or last longer, then you might wan to hold off on the splits for another week or two.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I am guessing you are think about doing a 'walk away' split. with a flow coming on this has a good potential to work... but you will still need to check on these +30 days to determine if the new queen made properly and is laying properly. in the mean time you might wish to find some source of queens if one or so of these 'walk away' splits doesn't produce an acceptable queen.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Sounds like a plan. The only concern I would have is the soybeans. They are a little different some produce a good honey crop while others dont. The same seed from year to year will vary on nectar produced.
     
  5. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I have 47 queen cells in 13 separate nucs of one kind or another. anything from a 2 fame to a 5 frame with even two 10 frame boxes trying to requeen. I was reading that a queen produced in August will still have time to build up for winter. I am hoping for no more than a fairly well populated 5 frame nuc. Next year will be about getting them built up to full strength and maybe even get a little bit of honey from them. My nucs from last winter did fairly well this year. For now I am looking to get two hives requeened and making up 11 nucs before winter. My record with queens this year has not been good.
     
  6. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    As far as the soybeans.

    I have no idea what kinds are planted. There are so many fields and they are at all different stages, from just starting to bloom to just now being planted. These 3 hives sit on 100 acres that had wheat and was just cut last week and is just now being planted. Almost all the fields are irrigated. The way that all the fields were planted at different times should mean a longer flow from the beans. We'll see how it goes.

    I do know about 10 miles from these hives a guy has 30 hives, all supered up, surrounded by beans as far as you can see. Maybe that's a good sign.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well hopefully soon you will know and hopefully you will inform us once you know no matter how that goes. at the point you notice the soybeans are in bloom a 'shake test' done from time to time (once a week or every other week) should give you some idea not only of yes or no but to some degree how much.