What are the benefits of freezing dead out frames

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by kemptville, May 8, 2013.

  1. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    I've read throughout that people who have suffered dead outs reuse their drawn frames and throw them in the freezer. What are the benefits of freezing frames for a few days? Is it only to conserve them from spoiling away in the sun if left in an empty colony or is it to kill off anything in particular that may reside in the foundation, capped stores, etc.
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    To make sure that there is no eggs or grubs from wax moth or small hive beetle are alive that will destroy the comb before you get more bees into the equipment
     

  3. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    Thanks Apis. What about mites, does freezing frames help kill off mites as well?
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Mites are dependent on the bees when the bees die the mites die also. So the mites are not a problem in storing comb as they require the bees to live.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If there's any live but unemerged brood harboring mites, freezing should do them in too. If all the cells are empty, any mites that might have been around should die of starvation for lack of nourishment, within two days. Unlike wax moths and SHBs, varroa is restricted to getting nourishment exclusively from living bees --larvae or adults, so a dead hive can't support them.
     
  6. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    What about other diseases like nosema, etc. What does freezing do if any for these ailments?
     
  7. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    I just got word that my nucs are ready for pick up Saturday! This leaves me a lot of work to do between now and then, stuff I was hoping to do at leisure in time for the first week of June.

    I appreciate all the responses I got concerning freezing frames etc.

    Cheers
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    When the bees are in the equipment and the colony is strong enough to cover all the frames the bees will control the wax moth and SHB by cleaning the grubs out of the hive. It is when the bees don't have the strength to defend the hive space that these pests take over the hive. freezing will do nothing for AFB, EFB, or Chaulk brood, if it is in the hive. Nosema is a bee virus that is in the bees so freezing will not effect it one way or the other.
     
  9. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    Thanks for the info Apis, luckily for us in Ontario there are very few cases of SHB.
     
  10. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Apisbees; what I have read is that nosema ceranae and apis are considered a parasite. Much larger than a virus. Cold temperatures will destroy its infectiveness which can be present in fecal matter on the combs. Here is a link http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests/nosema-ceranae Not sure if it states the time and temperature necessary but have seen it in other information.
     
  11. kemptville

    kemptville New Member

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    Thanks Crofter, the information you provided in the link will be a good read for sure this week.
     
  12. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Effectively I would think that if it were a winter deadout in your area, it likely got as cold in the hive as the frames would in your freezer so Apisbees advice is good; I was quibbling only about the nature of nosema. A hive that died out in warm weather would be a better candidate for freezing frames than a winter deadout.