Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am starting to inspect and repair my unsuccesful hives for next season...I am finding a "rippling" of the foundation in many of them. They were not exposed to afternoon sun, so I am stumped. What could it be? :confused: :confused: :confused:
BTW---If the rolling effect is not bad, can they be reused?----Just El Cheapo wondering. :mrgreen:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,162 Posts
If the bees don't mind why worry about it. Talk about wavy comb just look at some feral hives how they build their comb out.

G3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
that's happened to our family before and yes it's reusable so long as it won't harm the bees or wax.

however, theoretically it could be from heat and humidity inside the hive causing the wax to warp like wood. any way, that's just my theory about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Allvof the hives were in the same general area, so XLB's theory may just be a viable one......Thanks!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
for some reason our queens like to hide in the rippled frames, it's almost always their favorite place so we just leave them to it.

We have noticed that happening less in the hives that we left the screened bottoms open on and in the humid months we prop the tops with a couple of small sticks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
G3farms said:
I have had the foundation slip out from behind the wedge before.

G3

We had that happen too, only when I picked up that frame the whole thing decided to fall out and the bees really did not appreciate it! fortunately it wasn't completely drawn out so it didn't hurt anything to replace it. Unfortunately it broke so we couldn't use it again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,162 Posts
If they had started to draw it out you could have rubber banded it in place like a cut out, just a thought.

G3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
OH! I should've thought of that! It's too late now we already melted it down with our other wax from the spring honey flow :roll:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
I am not absolutely sure I understand exactly what (in which direction) rippling might occur... but I will add this tidbit for everyone's consideration.

in a feral hive of european origin the bottom edge of each sheet will display a slight wavey shape. in hive of african origin the bottom edge of the comb will be almost perfectly straight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Now,this is what makes this site stand out.....You won't read THAT in just any bee book. Thanks Tecumseh. I was hoping you'd notice the post.
LtlWilli
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
tecumseh said:
I am not absolutely sure I understand exactly what (in which direction) rippling might occur... but I will add this tidbit for everyone's consideration.

in a feral hive of european origin the bottom edge of each sheet will display a slight wavey shape. in hive of african origin the bottom edge of the comb will be almost perfectly straight.
that is great information! Thanks for mentioning it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
ltlwillie writes:
Now,this is what makes this site stand out.....You won't read THAT in just any bee book.

tecumseh:
thank ya' willie, but of course you could have read it in a particular bee book which is what I did.... which I guess??? would be Winston's The Bioliogy of the Honeybee.... maybe??? I think almost anyone who was exposed to european bees in their feral state or like myself anyone who removed any number of bees from residence and commerical space would pretty quickly notice that when you allow the girls to do as they 'naturally do' the bottom edge of the comb will invariable have a very noticable wavy shape*. Even though I am along the edge of the African bee's expansion area I have little to no experience with them dark girls... so that part of my prior comments most definitely comes via Mr Winston's book.

*in regards to european bees I have always wondered why in the construction of natural comb why the girls will suddenly turn a comb at an almost perfect right angle. I would GUESS that these consideration have something to do with the structural integrity of the comb. since the african bees is reported to accumulates small honey reserves, chooses a smaller nest site and maintains smaller numbers structural requirements should be less. totally guessing for sure.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top