What do to...

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by DonMcJr, Jul 22, 2012.

  1. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Ok I just went out and inpected all 3 Hives...and I need some advice...

    We'll start with the weak hive... Very few bees and only bottom deep drawn. Black wax foundations and there doesn't seem to be eggs or Brood. Some of the black areas looked dried out. I'm thinking Wax Moths but it could also be lack of water...

    Do I pull out all the crappy black comb and replace with new plasticell and start feeding and hope for the best?

    I knew this hive was weak and gonna be an issue so don't worry John it's fun trying to get it going!

    The 2nd new to me hive looks good. Only Half of the 1st Super Frames were drawn so I pulled off the top super...

    My Hive I think is almost ready to Harvest Honey! It was soo Darn HOT I was ready to pass out so all I did was peek in my top super and I saw all Capped Honey...not sure if it's all capped but My hive is doing good.

    The Heat was so bad I didn't even think of pics...I know I should have but man I am still hot here.

    Gotta go somewhere for a bit so I'll check back later and THANKS!

    Can anyone link some pics of Wax Moth and Wax comb dried out and whatever you think it may be?

    If not I'll go pull the bad frames again tomorrow and take pics...

    Oh yeah...pretty sure it's Wax Moth cause I seen something that look like the Wax Worms I use Ice Fishing Crawling...

    Not many Bees and I'm thinking now Maybe I should just Shut down the Hive and Package it or Split it Next year...or is there enough time to get it going this year still here in Michigan? I do have 2 Strong Hives...
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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  3. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    That was the worm...just one but there's no webs... just black comb, spots that look real dry and almost melted.

    After thinking more about it...what if I removed the bad frames and replaced them with frames of brood and larva from the good hives? Then start feeding. I think I saw a Queen but she actually flew away...:???:

    I just did a picture search and it was like there was just the one wax worm and not much damage almost like the bees that are left almost cleaned it up already.

    So...Would it harm my good hive to steal a few frames of brood? Cause if I can save this hive it will be cheaper than buying a new package next year; unless I do a split next year.

    I did see one queen cell. So I'm hoping I can save this hive and at least get it strong enough to survive the winter.

    If they made a new queen in the next week after I clear out the bad frames and replace with new will that be enough time to gain enough strenght for the winter? I guess if I tried even if it failed Im no worse off...
     
  4. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Ok nobody has responded but its Probally because you're all asleep cause I work midnights...LOL

    I've thought about this weak hive all night and pretty much decided I'm gonna get a frame of brood and eggs from each of my good hives and put them in the center of the weak hive. Then put new not drawn plasticell frames in the strong hives. If I can find any frames in the good hives that have queen cells I'm gonna use them frames and then any frame left in the weak hive that don't look up to par are gonna be replaced with new frames/plasticell too.

    Should I clear the brood frames of bees or put them bees on the frames in the weak hive? I know I have to watch for the queen if I do that. Then I'm gonna put the top feeder on and hope for the best.

    Man...my 1st year of beekeeping and I went from one hive to 3, got to move 2 hives and had to diagnosis wax moth and now I am trying to save a hive... I'm lovin this!
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I like your attitude, in for a penny.....:thumbsup:
    I would do as you suggested. Removing a frame from each of your strong hives should not harm them. If they are frames with brood, the bees on them are likely nurse bees and will be readily accepted by the receiving colony.
    At this point for your own piece of mind, remove any frames that you feel unsure of.
    Even if this does not work out (I suspect you will make out OK) you will have gained some additional knowledge. It is by trying that we learn.

    PS - 10 pm is usually around the time my head hits the pillow! :lol:
     
  6. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Thanks Perry!:thumbsup:
     
  7. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I am new to beekeeping but not knew to problem solving. So take it for what it is worth.
    My basic instinct and wisdom says not to throw good after bad. But I also understand the thrill of the challenge. In the end my decision would be made by my evaluation of my healthy hives. I have one hive that is begging for more room. If I had to provide that space why not do it trying to save a weak hive? But I would not weaken a good hive for it. So in my situation I would take a frame or two from the busting at the seems really does need room hive and put it in the weak one to clean it up. populate to do nothing more than protect the equipment and if in the end the hive never does take off they can always be combined back to the parent colony. Hopefully they will produce a queen and make you a new, strong hive. You get to live on the edge and win. Good for at least one solid strutting post. I really don't see how you can loose to bad with the proper attention and recognizing if the hive begins to thrive or continues to fail. Sort of brings to mind a word of wisdom I was once told.
    Show me a man that has never failed and I will show you a man that never tried to accomplish anything.

    You are going to fill this equipment with bees at some point. you can do it now from the hives that are strong enough to make the donation or do it later at the cost of a package or nuc. You might also choose to do it later at at time your other hives are even stronger. But you will eventually do it.

    I also think about the fact that two queens produce twice as many bees as one does. For this reason it is to your advantage to get this hive going a soon as possible. So again it is an advantage to get this hive started up. Not much of an issue but it is relevant and a consideration.

    Also selecting eggs from strong hives indicated a chance of getting a strong queen??? Maybe even select eggs from a specific hive in order to get a queen of better quality even. That may be over the top in detail and do ability but is still a possability. You can add some cream to the whole thing maybe.

    Well that is probably more than enough of my thinking so I will just leave it with best of luck on this.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    What are you calling bad frames? Just how much damage is there on them?

    If only very little, a few tunnels, then you could remove the frame, shake the bees off and freeze it, this will kill the wax moth larva (and any bee larva as well). Let it thaw out and give back to the bees.

    If you do give the weak hive a couple of frames of brood and they still have not built up good for the winter, a newspaper combine could be used to get them through and then split in the spring.
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    100_2747.jpg
    Extensive wax moth damage to the comb.

    100_2745.jpg
    Wax moth and mouse damage to the wax comb.

    100_2753.jpg
    Comb on the left is about 10 years old and natural.
    Comb on the right is 1 year old and drawn on wax foundation.
     
  10. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Don, sorry...I did not respond because I got too confused with your descriptions of 3 different hives. My brain couldn't keep things straight! :think:
     
  11. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    It does not look anywhere near as bad as any of them pictures that G3 posted. The frames just look black and kinda dry to me with a few 2 inch spots thst look a bit melted.

    Omie...
    Hive #1. I have my hive I packaged myself this year-Its doing great!
    Hive #2. A Weak Hive I just got from Farmall
    Hive #3. A Stronger Hive I got from Farmall.

    The Weaker Hive from Farmal is the one I am discussing...

    Daniel...I'm on the same page...The Hive I packaged myself this year is really strong and might need room but I got to go in it and double check.