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I would at least get a styrofoam board (comes in 4x8 sheets at home depot) and cut a piece to fit inside the lid. Reason: Moisture sticks to cold surfaces. On sidewalls it slips down to the bottom of the hive and out. On top, it rains on bees. That plus your top entrance (which many northern keeps say is the only way their bees can exit for waste runs in deep snow) should keep your bees from being rained on with cold drops, and vented some via that top opening. You will want to insulate the nuc's lid as well, just a styrofoam sheet.
 

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Queen should lay a BUNCH right now for you. then when winter bees hatch, expect a pile of mites on the bottom board. and she will quit laying and shut down after those winterbees hatch, my guess for your climate October 10th but it is a guess
 

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I switched the frames that had comb and bees into a nuc and put another nuc box ontop with a feeder, hopefully the confined space will help the remaining bees guard the hive and stay warm in the winter.the one entrance is now reduced to about an inch.its still pushing 80degrees plus today, as its becomes colder out I will insulate the hive..
 

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yes, on insulation, trying to remember your zone. I put mine down in my signature line.

I don't have to insulate here, but I usually take a piece of that silver bubble wrap (left over from an attic adventure) and tape it on the north side of the nuc stack or the hive stack so it goes from top to bottom on the north side. I also use a piece of foam board in the lid. and a penny on top of the hive to allow ventilation below the lid. Just a little.

Long Island New York? Yup, you're gonna need some insulation on all 4 sides, and top but be sure you put a penny on top of the top box, under the insulation and lid, to allow moisture to vent. 4 pennies, one on each side.
I use the betterbee poly nuc boxes up here [Massachusetts] I often find the queen on the outside frames in these because they can cover the whole box and stay warm. Very good overwintering with them.
 

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Thank you Camero! I barely remember how to drive on ice, sure don't know much about beekeeping in it except ventilation is important
 

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Now I have to decide whether to combine my nuc hive with a bigger one, or swipe some brood from a bigger one and put them on top of it for heat, and I have to take my biggest one apart to change the bottom board. Tomorrow is not sounding fun. all of that is after work
 

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I use the homosote boards to collect moisture so it doesn't drip down on the hives. This year I'm trying a new method that uses a box that fits on top of the brood chambers that has insulation inside it along with a homosote board that also collects moisture. I use a bee cozy as well. the boxes are about 3-4 inches tall and the cozy nearly covers them. I make sure to keep the upper entrance open for ventilation and which allows the bees to fly out to do their business during the winter. We can get pretty cold winters up here in northern Connecticut, so I'm hoping the new method with the insulation boxes on top help. BTW, they are painted black to attract heat. My bees face east for the morning sun to warm them and have tree cover behind them to block the wind. Keeping my fingers crossed that all survive!
 
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