what if?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by riverrat, Aug 15, 2010.

  1. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Lets liven this up and have some fun learning at the same time. Im going to post here a scenario and lets have some of the newbees chime in with there idea of what to do before us old timers get to it. We might all learn something so lets set back and have some fun.

    You go to the out yard where you have 5 hives of bees all hives are side by side with just enough room to get the top cover off. Its in the middle of august and a dearth is on the heat is up and the stock market down. you stop to observe the entrances to all 5 hives before you begin. Your first hive is booming bees bearding up the front of the hive the 2nd hive is not as strong but bees going and comming the third hive has no action at all the fourth is booming as is the 5th you start your inspection. you dont find but very little brood in any of the hives some are starting to look honey bound. you had supers on all the hives since april you now find that most of the honey that was in the supers has disapeared. the Hive with no action you open and find it smells like death the cappings on the brood is dark and sunk in. very few bees after you open the 2nd hive it sets off a robbing frenzy from the other hives. So what would you newbies would say is the problems and how would you go about tackling them.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I've only got about 35 years. Am I still a newbie? :confused:
     

  3. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Lack of brood in the dearth is normal (don't have babies if you can't feed them.) Hive #3 sounds like foul brood and it may have affected #2 as you said it had fewer bees than 1,4,5,. the robbing on #2 may spread the problem to all the others.lock down #2 by closeing upper entrances restrict or close bottom entrance to stop the robbing.Test hive #3 for FB and proceed as needed. Jim Hope I don't flunk. LOL
     
  4. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    As far as the missing honey they prob. bacfill to the hive, if I'm not expecting a fall bloom I might leave the brood chambers alone for winter feed, if a fall bloom looks good pull 3-4 center frames and replace in the top hive body. Jim
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what if's are good... keep up the good work riverrat.
     
  6. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Am I the only NewBee willing to open mouth and insert foot???????Come on rookies don't leave me to the sharks all alone. Jim
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    jim you left them speachless you might be like ef hutton. When EF Hutton speaks people listen
     
  8. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Could be, but I ain't that smart. LOL Jim
     
  9. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Jim stepped in and made a good attempt at saving his hives. The rest of us did nothing just closed them up and walked away and it looks like the hives got another problem after your inspection. Its now been a couple of months since you have checked in on them. You now have 3 of the hives with dark sunken cappings that smell like death itself. Another bee keeper has looked in on your hives and has discovered there may be a case of foul brood. You are in a dearth and the possiblity of robbing is high. This keep has bees a 1/2 a mile away and is afraid the foul brood may spread to his hives. To keep this from happening he has contacted the state apiary inspector. In turn the inspector has called you wanting to check in on your hives what do you do now.
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Tell the state man to come on down, then start digging a hole and gathering up some kindling
     
  11. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    I would HOPE that if I had this problem to start with that I would have called the state inspector to check my hives and not wait to possibly affect the local hives of anouther Beek. QUESTION for the WISE GUYS/GALS if a bee from an infected (foul brood)hive is eaten by a bird, and then that bird voids its waste on a hive miles away will the virus be viable and contagious??. Jim
     
  12. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I would say yes. It would be a long shot. and if it happened to me I would go buy a lottery ticket fast. In reality It would all depend on if the birds digestive system is able to break down the spores.
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    In actuality, most hives have some spores at all times. It takes certain conditions for them to multiply enough to cause an outbreak.
     
  14. charmd2

    charmd2 New Member

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    I have three cases of foulbrood. Suspected. I would Shake every last bee out of those three boxes, On to new foundation, add feeders. Feed like crazy.

    Double bag the hives I shook from and throw them in the deep freezer until the inspector arrives, but, be already planning on the bonfire.