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I'm picking up a hive this weekend but I don't have a feeder. I've seen pros and cons of each. I've never had bees before so I was wondering what type of feeder I should get?

Jason
 

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A boardman is cheap and will work fine until June. After the bloom is over and there is nothing natural for them, a boardman will cause robbing. After June, a hive top of some sort is best.
A homemade migratory lid with a 2 3/4" hole in the top for an inverted mason jar works fine year round.
 

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I rarely do any feeding but I'll tell you what kind I don't like: and inside frame feeder. Whenever used, no matter how many or what kind of "floaters" I used, they always led to a lot of bees drowning.:cry:
 

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i like and use the one gallon pail feeders inverted over the hole in the inner cover, with an extra hive body over it, and the top cover on top of that. if you use these, find an extra bigger pail of some sort. when these are inverted they do slop some syrup out. before you invert and place the pail on the inner cover, invert the feeder pail first over the empty bucket to ensure a good seal on the pail, that it is not leaking, and the extra pail catches the syrup that initially gets slopped out.
also, if you didn't get the lid on tight, the bucket catches the syrup that spills out all over creation....:grin:
 

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I started with these hive top feeders.
pros - hold lots of feed
cons - expensive, and always had a hard time getting them off, bees glued them down tight and would lift frames when trying to get'em off.
- these are 5 or 6 years old and as can be seen, I only used them once.



Then I went with these bucket feeders.
Pros - cheap, hold lots.
Cons - during wild temp swings from night to day, the air expands in 'em and pushed syrup out, what a mess.



I finally settled on these.
Pros - not overly expensive
- never had a single bee drown
- easy as pie to work
Cons - only holds a half gallon or so, more trips. (but then I like visiting with my bees more than most probably anyways!) :wink:
 

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My personal preference is the hive top feeders, only issue for me is the inevitable drowned bees that can't seem to find the floating floor to stay out of the feed.
Barry
 

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If you have time to hand feed them a small container is OK but you should not let them ever run out once you start feeding unless a natural flow comes on. The frame feeders take up hive space and seem to drown bees and get glued in and hard to pry out when you want to. Size does matter!:wink:
 

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If you have time to hand feed them a small container is OK but you should not let them ever run out once you start feeding unless a natural flow comes on. The frame feeders take up hive space and seem to drown bees and get glued in and hard to pry out when you want to. Size does matter!:wink:
:cry: And mine are so small. :cry:

:lol: :rolling: :rotfl:
 

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I order of preferance

1. Mother Nature, not so good for a new or weak hive

2. Quart or 2 Quart jars or even 1 gal. CLEAN/NEW paint cans. Very good for new or weak hives and feeding a few in general

3. 5 gal. buckets for open feeding, edge drilled for rain control and floating material to cut down on dead bees
 

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frame feeders.

as a negative do not invest even a plug nickel for a boardman feeder... that has to be the cruelest joke ever attempted on new beekeepers.

ps... almost by default open feeding seems to be have been missed here.
 

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A gun.
A queen excluder.
A boardman feeder.

Very fine tools when used properly.
Very dangerous in untrained hands.

:razz: :razz: :thumbsup: :lol:
 

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I use gallon glass pickle jars over inner cover :thumbsup: cheap and easy to deal with
 

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Cheap????? You obviously don't buy the groceries for the house! :lol:
Just how many jars of pickles do you buy??? :shock:
:rolling:I can get a glass gallon jar of pickles for $4.95 I probly got 150 jars or more stashed back before the Dr. slowed me down on the pickle eating and blood pressure issues. :grin:
 

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My all time favorites don't seem to be available anymore. They're hivetop with the opening at the front with screening overall. The bees climb up the screening and down to the syrup. The only time I've had drowning was when they were so desperate, they stood on each other and held some bees under the the syrup! That only happened to me once. I really like them because you can feed in winter without letting in the cold, and the bees can't fly out when you lift the outer cover. If I need more and can't find them anywhere, my husband is on alert to make me some using the ones I have for measurements, etc.
 

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Miller hive top feeder. By the way Tia, you can make them fairly easily.
 

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I will be using my 1gal pickle jars to feed. I only have two jars. AND two hives! lol. When I get more hives will go to plan B.
 

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I've been putting a gallon ziplock bag out on a table in the yard. As long as they're flying, it's available. I don't think there's any other beekeepers within 5 miles of me, so I think I'm pretty much ok. Pretty much a no-fuss operation.
 
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