What is it?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by brooksbeefarm, Aug 26, 2010.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Went to my northern bee yards today, all were very strong hives . Two hives that i took up in late june that were nuc's that i put in deep hive bodies, had something i haven't seen before. I first thought it was uncapped brood or chalk brood, it looked like full term larva that wasn't capped and was mixed in with the brood like salt and pepper?, it was snow white and shiny and came to the very top of the worker brood cell but not capped. My 84 year old buddy and mentor (had bees from 9 yrs old to now) said he thought it was uncapped brood but i don't think so.A club member called me about supplies and i told her about it and she said it sounds like SHB larva, i've not had SHB's yet but it's got me wondering now. Anyone have an idea what i might be dealing with. Jack

    PS I don't know how to take a picture and post it yet, i'm going to see if my 9 yr. old grandaughter will teach grandpa how. :lol:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you had shb larva that big, you would also have slime trails across the frame like a slug snail leaves. It sounds like you have something killing bee larva just before it caps.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Iddee, In one hive two frames had this and the rest of the brood (4 frames) was solid and normal, the other hive had only one effected frame and the rest was normal and the bees in both hives showed no sign of stress or sickness.I wish i had pull some out and looked at them but it was hot and i was afraid Howard, my buddy was getting to hot, i know i was. Jack
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    possible a low dose of pesticide poison not strong enough to kill adult bees but killing the larva just a thought
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've had uncapped pupae in spotty areas. It has always cleared up by the next inspection. I think riverrat may have the answer. Whether it be pesticide or something else, I think it is a passing malady that will be gone in a week or two.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This is in farm country (cattle, not crop) its rough unkept pasture land with some hay fields. I heard that a neighboring farm was sold, i'll go back up next week and check those hives and meet the new neighbor. The previous owner had a garden and lots of flowers and shrubs (her husband was killed 2 yrs. ago cutting wood, tree fell on him) the new people maybe using a spray? It was real strange looking (the larva) i've never seen this before, when i was putting the frame back in the hive it looked like some of the larva would have slid out if i would have shook it? Like i said, it was hot and you don't question Howard nowaday or he''ll sull-up (85 yrs old) but it got my attention. Jack
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have to agree with Howard. I think it's uncapped brood, but not living brood. That small an amount may be from one small flower bed in the neighborhood.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would not rule out riverrats hypothesis as something that might weaken a hive and I should add that a prolonged dry spell (like here now) can perform somewhat the same trick simply by depriving the hive of feed (ie marginal or severe starvation).

    first let me assume Jack that you know what uncapped larvae looks like. very white and curled tightly in spiral and they don't normally crawl much (or well). small hive beetle are a much more straight and they have a slight yellow marking at the head end. with heavy infestation upon disturbing a frame they fall/crawl out of the frame and fall to the bottom board. with the exception of the small yellow band on their head they are about the same color as healthy brood. although small they crawl very well. the sliming takes place a bit later when the infestation is really gone south. as far as I notice the most intense infestation in frames are more around pollen than nectar (which at the point of starvation is limited anyway).

    burning any residue that fall from the hive and freezing frames for a minimum of 24 hours are both essential in staying ahead of the shb. to resurrect the hive a bit of intense feeding is required + sometimes a frame of sealed brood if the hives population is depleted.
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think and hope that Rat is right, the larva is snow white and fills the worker cell almost to the top of the cell, no curl but standing straight up it looks like HFCS in a cell that has granulated. As soon as i get a break i'm going to run back up there and take a closer look without Howard :mrgreen: . Jack