What is the optimal frame configuration for 2-10 frame deeps going into winter?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by hlhart2001, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    One of my hives(3-8frame deeps) went belly up(trying to turn catastrophe into opportunity) and I now have 10+ deep frames of honey and 5 or so frames of pollen. I have one hive in 2-10 frame deeps that was requeened mid summer and is light on stores(I have been feeding)...I would love to stick some of the honey/pollen frames in and I have a very small window of opportunity to do this because we are getting some warmer temps(hitting 50+..bees are out flying around) . What is the configuration going into winter..should I put the honey closest to the bees and pollen on outside...something like Pollen Pollen Honey Honey BeesBees Honey Honey Pollen Pollen? Thanks, Halley
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Bees and pollen on bottom, bees in center, pollen on outside, honey on top. The bees will do the rest.
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    What did you loose it to? Wasps? I have heard of them talking out a few colonies this fall and late summer.
    the bottom box is bee cluster space so on a warm day in the top super have -H-H-HP-HP-HO-HO-HP-HP-H-H-. the honey pollen frames you want ones that have some pollen for the bees to use for early brood rearing before the natural pollen starts being brought in should be a mix of honey stores with some pollen. Lack of early spring pollen isn't a problem as the pussy willows come out early and the spring bloom continues. Because of the humidity here in winter, pollen left in the bottom box generally molds during the winter. which is not a bad thing as then the bees clean out and repairs the frames. As a rule we get to much pollen brought into the hives here in the Okanagan. The HO frames are ones that have honey with a bit of open empty cells in the bottom of the frame.
     
  4. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    The hive was busy up until a couple days before the first snowfall(which melted and then snowed again and then melted and now we have this unbelievably warm weather). I notice yellow jackets going in and out along with the bees. When it snowed I noticed that there was no sound, no bees peeking out the top entrance like the other 2 hives. Went in...just a few bees..so it probably went queenless and slowly dissipated over time or they swarmed late(the hive was very heavy and with all the activity and my inexperience I was fooled into thinking they were aok)..and all the activity I saw was most likely robbing...this was a large,strong hive early on and into the summer, even took a frame or two of eggs to help out the queenless one.
    Anyway, I went into the one light on stores(the one that requeened itself)...lots of bees..The majority appear to be hanging out in the 2nd deep toward the SW side, although there a good number down below...I moved the frames of bees toward the center and, took out any really lightweight frames, stuck 2 frames honey on each side plus a frame of pollen..there weren't any HP combos. I have 3-4 pollen frames left(I just brought them in...what else would I do with them?)
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Bees will only fill a cell 1/2 way with pollen and will store honey and cap it in the top 1/2 the cell so if the frames where near to where brood was being raised the frames will have pollen in them that will become available to the bees as they consume the honey. By spring they will have uncovered enough pollen to start early brood rearing before the trees start to bud and bloom.
     
  6. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    This is one of those real beekeeping nuggets of knowledge, you regularly share with others in your posts. After reading the post above I could picture the frame with pollen in the lower half of cells.:smile:
    Something I saw so many times, but apparently not enough to record it in my memory, and share it as a useful information with others.
    Maybe after few more years of beekeeping I will improve.:grin:
    ​Thanks Apis
     
  7. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    If you have room in the freezer, you can freeze the pollen frames till spring and then pop them in to help with early brood rearing. Freezing will help retain the nutritive value of the pollen.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    boy old Iddee don't waste many words and always cuts directly to the chase.
     
  9. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Iddee is an old Indian word for "man with few words."