What is this?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DonMcJr, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    A co-worker was looking for a deer his son shot and found this in the woods.

    3 feet off the ground...in Southeast Michigan...
     

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  2. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    looks like a feral bee colony to me (abandoned) The swarm probably couldn't find a cavity of any kind and started building comb in the thick bushes. you can see the darker areas where the brood was.
     

  3. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Yes a badly selected site the bees would have considered it a sheltered site with the leaves on the shrubs, then fall arrived and the lack of leaves left them exposed. If the wasps hornets and other bees in the area haven't robed them out yet there could be a small cluster of bees in the center but I doubt it. it was to easy of a target and to hard for the bees to protect. I doubt the bees absconded but were taken and killed.
    there is value in the wax hanging in the bush.
    In the display at the fair we have a feral colony from a tree hanging in a plexi glass display, it is an attention getter and conversation starter. if shows what honey bees do in the wild when not attended by beekeepers.
    It would look great hanging in the corner of some ones honey house along with an large wasp or bald face hornets nest. When the public asks or school tour you can point out the different between the insects.
    What I'm suggesting is go pick it up before some one shoots a hole in it or is already to late?
     
  5. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    ApisBees....I am still learning....but taken and killed by whom or what please? I had open comb eaten by a racoon, but what critter would take/kill the bees? Thanks!
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    First, WELCOME to our friendly part of the beekeeping community! :hi:

    There are several predators of honey bees, such as skunks, wasps, hornets, even another stronger colony of honeybees could have attacked it and robbed it out. Skunks would not be able to reach that though.
     
  7. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    @ Perrybee:

    Some of our skunks could have reached this colony. We have two legged skunks.
     
  8. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    lazy shooter: LOL I forgot........everythings BIGGER in TEXAS. :rotfl:
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Bees in Miami, greetings upon joining the forum and becoming one of the many learners here. I dare say, that includes all of us, since no one knows everything there is to know about bees. We enjoy learning together and are glad to have you in our ranks. :clap:
     
  10. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    Thanks for the welcomes everyone! Much appreciated!! Wonderful to see so many parts of the World represented here! Wow!
     
  11. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Bees in Miami Sorry I missed your post earlier. My friend Perrybee answered your question. That happens here a lot but that's a good thing cause some times we don't get back to often. Ants will attack a colony and birds eat lots of insects bees included. Welcome to the form but I encourage you to introduce yourself to the form in you own thread under new introductions so you can be greeted properly.
     
  12. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Welcome to the forum bees of Miami as has been stated previously there are many predators that will attack a colony of honey bees if they believe they can get away with it down here in Florida fire ants will destroy a colony of honey bees if it is weak. As the weather cools down hornets in Yellow Jackets are still active and will attack individual honey bees in force you might have a couple dozen hornets or Yellow Jackets or both making raids at the same time on a weak colony and after the Hornets and yellow jackets are done the ants will clean up. Skunks are perhaps the worst offenders of the mammals ( excluding black bear because black bears actually destroy the hive) skunks are only interested in eating the bees but they will return night after night after night.
    Barry
     
  13. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    its something to get you thinking, down here its not uncommon at to see comb hanging like that but up there its a total oddity, that hive was doomed from the start, if the predators didnt get the winter would have. and welcome Miami to the forum, its a great place to hang and get the knowledge you need to further you beekeeping.
     
  14. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I'm with zookeep, when that happens here in SW. Mo. the fall rains followed by cold weather will do them in, and your farther north of us. Jack
     
  15. LunacyMountain

    LunacyMountain New Member

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    sad for the bees, they thought they had a sweet spot... but take advantage of nature and scoop up that wax....
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Isn't it sad to think that such wondrous insects as bees have become so dependent on human beings for their continued successful existence. I know, they're not totally dependent on us. but certainly more than one would find acceptable.
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    just for the record I have seen feral bees in northern Louisiana make it thru one winter in a totally exposed nest with nothing but a large branch of a pine tree and lots of pine needles to protect it during the winter time. there is not a lot of severe cold there but ice and sleet sometime during the winter is fairly common. the nest was finally scraped off the limb by a very large tree harvesting rig/semi.