What kind of bees do you have ? For everyone.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by busybee, Sep 23, 2008.

  1. busybee

    busybee New Member

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    I'm just starting to get interested in having bees and would like to know what kind of bees You have. Can you have more than one kind? Do they stick to their own hive?

    Is there a Bee book with this kind of info that is better and easier to understand than another? Sort of a book every beekeeper should have. Please give me your heartfelt answers as I have lots to learn. Thank you all.
     
  2. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Hey busybee, Having more than one type is ok to do, I'd stick with one type of bee for now though, when you mix you may need to deal with robbing as some build up quicker than others. As a beginner you'll have plenty to watch out for in your first year.

    I usually recommend beekeeping101 from discoverbeekeeping but I'm biased cause I know the author and I run the site for him ;)
     

  3. TimTex

    TimTex New Member

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    If you want two "kinds" of bees, you might consider Cordovans..just a color variation of Italian. Same in all regards except color. I, myself, enjoy the Cordovan color (blonde bees). Being a resesive gene, after a couple superceedures, most will be normal Italian color from crossing with normal Italians. The Cordovan gene is all over in my apiary so Cordovan Queens will just pop up from time to time. I had some Russians, I was not fond of them.
     
  4. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    Right now, I have Russians , MN. Hygenics, and a huge feral hive that leans heavily to Italian/ Carniolan crossbreeding. I am out there with them several times everyday. I guess they haveaccepted me as a no-danger visitor , as getting stung is getting to be a rarity----not that I miss that... ;)
     
  5. albee

    albee New Member

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    HI, well I have melifera melifera , a dark almost black bee, its a good fast producer, but can be a little like a loaded gun, its ok when its pointed away from you but if it swings in your direction its time to leave. LOL They can be quite contrary to say the least but they do seem to accept me most of the time.
    I also have Italians, which are a great bee for a beginner, not to crazy to swarm and easy to be around.
    And last I have Minnisota Hygenics, very easy to work as well. I would say that these days the kind isn't so important as there traits, and survivability is number one. If you can find bees that are considered survior bees, that is what you want.
    Most of the bees are pretty easy to handle once your comfortable they are too.

    Good luck and welcome to the bee hobby.
     
  6. cacklewack

    cacklewack New Member

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    My current hive has Carniolans, however, this Spring I will be using 10 Carniolan hives and 10 Italian hives to see which does better.

    Matt
     
  7. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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    we just got regler bees round here :shock:
     
  8. 1of6

    1of6 New Member

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    Apis Regulis, right? :lol:

    Mutts for me. Russian, Italian, and Carni all mixed together in a bowl and seasoned over a few winters.
     
  9. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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    when i went to get my first hive i asked the old guy what kind of bees he had,he said "jess regler bees" lol. so thats what i tell people who ask,they are mostly honey colored except for the last couple rings on the back,thats when it turns solid black :lol:
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    My bees are like me......Mutts. :eek:
     
  11. JDNewberry

    JDNewberry New Member

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    I started out a few years back with 3-banded Italians then eventually set up a hive of Cordovans. I've heard that there is only a color difference between these races, but in my experience the Cordovans are much gentler. I've since changed all my hives over to Cordovans. If the honey flow is on I can work my hives in shorts and a t-shirt without fear of being stung. I'll never have another race.
     
  12. Bobb

    Bobb New Member

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    Here in Durango Carniolan is a best bet. They winter with a smaller colony and build fast in the spring. Gentel too.
     
  13. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I have some that are labeled minnasooooota Hygenics. one hive that is supposed to be russians and a whole lot of hives that known mutts from cuttouts and swarms. I am going to go out on limb here I would say that since most queens are open mated the majority of bees in the United states are Mutts. including all mine :?:
     
  14. An-Nahl

    An-Nahl New Member

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    Have Italians... adding Russians (6) this year.
     
  15. trumpet01

    trumpet01 New Member

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    I have some Buckfast queens I got from Canada...."A". Also some local Heinz 57's.
     
  16. gingerbee

    gingerbee New Member

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    Mixed genetics. Don't selectively breed, so the hives become whatever is out there in the wild. Diversity is good. If I order queens this year they are probally going to be Cordovan's. I like gentle bees.
     
  17. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Have no idea anymore. I've been keeping bees over six years now and during that time have bought only 2 queens, letting my girls requeen when necessary. They started out as buckfasts. The 2 queens I did buy were Italian. Now I've got all kinds. . .yellow only, yellow & black, gray only, black only. But the important part: they're very sweet and docile. . .far different from the original buckfasts!
     
  18. smgchandler

    smgchandler New Member

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    anyone know of a chart or pics that show each type of honeybee - i have a swarm thats mostly dark and then some striped ones that are not so dark and then some striped but lighter in color - not that it matters but i would like to know what i have - whats the kind of bees that die way down and live the winter with a small amount of bees - i think the nuc i got last year is that kind and the swarm is dark and the package bought from BM is striped but not as dark as the swarm hive - the swarm is the meanest and the nuc is very mild mannered - the bought hive is medium tempered - sounds like a got a real mix
     
  19. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I mainly have russians and carni's and a mix between the two. My overwinter loss dropped by 2/3 when I culled out all my italians.
     
  20. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Until a week ago, I've only had "Purdue Italians." Dr. Greg Hunt at Purdue has been working for several years trying breed bees that are both mite-resistant and overwinter well here in Indiana. He works with about a half-dozen in-state queen breeders, and I get my queens from one of them.

    Last week I picked up a hive of Carniolans from a suburban beekeeper who felt she had maxed-out what her neighbors would tolerate. This hive will need to be split shortly and she didn't want to her neighbors to freak at seeing yet another hive!