What should I be looking for?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ASTMedic, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    So late this week I'm going to do my first inspection. I'm going to get the frames apart since when I installed them from the Nuc I did so as a mass. I'm also going to start a 1:2 feed in the frame feeder.

    What do I need to be checking for? I know I want to see if I have eggs in cells and try and find the queen. What are the big things I want to see to know the Nuc install went well? What can I be looking for on a daily basis to see if they are doing well?
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    first off you need to feed a 1 to 1 syrup mix for build up.

    As for looking, eggs will tell you if you have a queen even if you don't see her. If you do see her be sure to be careful when you put that frame back in the box and push the frames together SLOWLY, this will give her time to move around and maybe not get crushed. Look for brood in all of the different stages.... eggs, larva that is in a "C" shape, and then standing on end, capped brood, hatching bees, worker cells, drone cells, queen cup, nectar, honey, capped honey, bee bread, new wax being pulled into comb, propolis, worker bees, drone bees, the queen, bees feeding brood, bees feeding the queen, queen laying eggs, hive beetles, varroa mites, bee dance, pollen in their baskets, etc, etc.

    Take your time and look at everything that is going on.

    You can watch the landing board and tell what is going on in the hive also. What is going in, what is being thrown out. Bee activity...fighting, guarding, wash boarding, bearding, orientation flights, etc.

    A good sunny day with little to no breeze and plenty of things blooming make for an easy inspection. cool foul weather will make the a little more fussy.

    To see eggs get the sun to your back and let it shine down into the cells, look for what is a tiny white grain of rice standing on its end.

    Good luck!
     

  3. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Thanks

    What are signs on the landing board of a good colony? Just want to understand what I see day to day.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    bees coming and going, bringing in pollen and nectar. If you watch close enough and long enough the bees will bee just a tad smaller when they leave and a tad swelled up looking when they return....full of nectar! Pollen in their baskets. Bees guarding the entrance and checking out the returning bees, washboarding (looks like they are line dancing), fanning the entrance, carrying out a dead bee or two (just general house keeping), orientation flights, drones looking around.
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you are seeing fighting and a bunch of dead bees this is a sign of robbing.

    Dead bees piled up by the hundreds could be a pesticide kill.

    Look at the bees wings for deformed wing virus, mites on their body, bees walking around disorientated and even falling off of the end of the landing board.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    awesome advice by g3, snookie too.....
    couldn't add to what g3 said.

    "What are signs on the landing board of a good colony? Just want to understand what I see day to day."
    what do you need to look for on the landing board?
    snookie said-#5." Daily, watch TV or post on forum. Weekly, check hive"..........great advice ! ..... :grin: i would change or skip the watch tv daily to watch the landing board daily and then post on the forum :lol:

    so, the landing board, just a few, how much activity is there? are bees bringing in pollen and nectar? are there bees orienting to the hive? are they fighting? are they doing a 'dance', are they bearding on the hive? do bees look sick? watching will help teach, and be an indicator as to what is going on inside the hive.
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :thumbsup: :lol: :thumbsup:
     
  8. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Ok so I'm feeding syrup now (like I should have been all along) and bought some UltraBee patties when I ordered some items from Mann. Should I throw a patty on top of the frames when I inspect the hive this week?

    I'm not seeing much in the way of pollen coming into the hive right now.
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    It can't hurt. They will take it if they need it. :wink:
     
  10. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Ok that's what I thought. Thanks
     
  11. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    like perry said ast, i would, it can't hurt, when natural pollen starts coming in, they will stop taking it. in the meantime, the patty helps to build them up.
     
  12. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Ya that was my intention. I'd like to give them any assistance I can to build the numbers.

    Is there any risks to feeding? Either sup or syrup? Sounds as if the bees are smart enough to go forage when the natural food is available.
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    They will ignore the syrup when they find the real deal, you'll know.
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    what perry said,
    and if you have no nectar coming in right now, feed them 1:1 syrup, especially if you have foundation in, that needs to be drawn.
     
  15. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Yep the syrup went on top feeder Monday night. They seem to be doing well with that.

    I've been on shift since installing the Nuc and only see them first thing in the morning and then at 10:30 at night when I get home. All seems to be on track though.
     
  16. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    So I pulled the frames apart today.

    Couldn't find the queen to save my life but I did see 4 queen cells. I pulled out the queen cage from the Nuc and tossed it.

    Pulled off the SBB and put the solid one with just a mouse guard and no reducer. I figured they would like more air movement.

    Syrup feeder needed refilling. A quart in 4 days, not bad.

    Brood is laid out spotty and only what looked to be half a frame.

    Bees are building comb but not on the new frames. Don't think the like the RiteCell (or whatever it's called).

    Input?

    What's with the queen cells?
     
  17. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Queen cells could be either swarm cells or supercedure cells. With not much brood and spotty at best I would venture to guess supercedure.
     
  18. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Been reading up on queen cells. They look to be supersedure cells. Middle of the frame all of them. All closed too.

    So what, if anything, do I need to do?
     
  19. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Just sit back and wait.
    When the queen cells are first capped over they are fragile for about three days. Much movement or jarring them around and you could make the larva fall to the bottom of the cell away from the royal jelly, thus killing her.
     
  20. ASTMedic

    ASTMedic New Member

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    Well I moved the frames around but was super careful. I'll just give them a few weeks or a month and let them do their things. Hope I didn't screw the pooch.