What should we be doing this month with the Bees

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by BCBEES, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. BCBEES

    BCBEES New Member

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    What should we do for the bees this month
     
  2. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    Welcome BCBEES! I'm a first-year beekeeper, but here's what I've learned. Harvest your honey and remove the supers so the bees can prepare their winter space. Check and treat for mites and other pests if necessary. Check honey stores and feed if necessary. Install a mouse guard before it gets cold and the critters are looking for shelter. Here in northern Utah, I'm told you should have your supers off by Labor Day (my very first extraction is this w/e)to give the bees time to rearrange the furniture. Now I'll defer to the :eek:ldtimer: here to correct or fill in the gaps.:lol:
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I would say litefoot has it pretty well in order. :thumbsup: I don't imagine in Texas you worry too:lol: much about wrapping 'em for winter.
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    In Florida and warmer climates with a couple flows still to come -- make spplits. If it snows there just make sure they have as much food as brood and a way to get to it in the winter by removng the queen excluder.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I guess I should look up the exact location of Clute. Texas is a large state and therefore what you might be doing or not doing is somewhat dictated by location and after that your purpose and/or philosophy.

    By this time of the year you should be approaching the time when any honey being taken and extracted should be about done. As we approach the fall of the year if you treat for varroa (I do not) then the next 45 days should be the appropriate time to test and treat for varroa. Fall prep is a good thing to keep on your priority list.... for me this means checking for feed, inserting feeder and feeding where critical, checking for queen rite status and stacking anything that looks to be a serious problem. managing the internal space of a hive at this time of years for me translate into removing any excess space and some time pulling a bit of brood and feed (see next paragraph).

    For myself I rear a few queens and make a few late fall nucs with whatever extra brood and bees and feed presents itself as I reduce the dimension of hive down to some optimal fall and winter time size (for me about a story and a half max).

    and welcome aboard....
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    My job seems to be catching and hiving my own swarms. My 2 vsh nucs turned into very large hives. One swarmed 8/25, and my neighbor got a new hive out of it. The other swarmed today, and are presently occupying an empty nuc on the greenhouse roof.

    Other than that I just feed and feed and feed. There is plenty of pollen but not much nectar coming in. Someone could clarify - does Crape Myrtle produce anything that feeds bees?
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    bcbees,
    litefoot, as perry said "has it pretty well in order". :grin:

    as tecumseh suggested "what you might be doing or not doing is somewhat dictated by location and after that your purpose and/or philosophy."

    i also like what tecumseh said. i am in the north, you are in the south, but some things are common for us all to do about this time of year for our bees. here in the north, i like to get the honey off before labor day. this year for me was late. my philosophy is, i like to give the bees the fall flow for their winter stores, (less costly feeding of sugar syrup), and it gives me additional time to ascertain what feed is needed for winter survival in two deeps after supers are removed. some frames with high moisture content are fed back if needed. feeding must be completed before mid october. hives are monitored weekly to see the weight that they need for my northern winter.

    i hope your hives are queenright and healthy. at this time of the year, if i have a hive that is not queenright, or healthy, then she will not survive. i must look for these signs in my hives and my climate well before fall and manage them before this time of year. i do not treat for mites, however, many beekeepers here in the north do, and they treat for them as soon as supers are taken from the hives. i need every bee in my two deeps for winter cluster, so don't do splits or nuc hives.

    robbing....i also do the best i can to reduce or eliminate any robbing of hives not as strong as my strongest hives after supers are removed. i do not 'encourage' the bees natural behavior to rob one another out. entrance reducers, or screens might go on for a short period of time, and i do not open feed, or place wet cappings out, or supers out. wet supers to be cleaned up from extraction are equally placed on top the hives, or not given at all until spring.

    btw, welcome to the forum!:grin:
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    as it turns out Clute is down around Lake Jackson and somewhat close to the coast. given the approximate distance to the coast you should have very little winter and preping for winter means putting in some kind of entrance reducer.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    wow! and welcome to the forum
     
  10. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Welcome bcbees to the froum, can learn a lot here, know I have.

    kebee