what to do with a frame completely full of pollen?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by DLMKA, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    well, not COMPLETLEY full, there is some capped honey at the top but the rest of the frame is chock full of pollen. If I just leave it I used up space in the brood box that could be used for brood so I'm not really sure what to do with it. I pulled it out yesterday and replaced it with a frame of eggs in a hive that isn't queenright ~5 weeks after swarming.
     
  2. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I say leave it. Apparently the bees think they need it or or wouldn't be in there. Kinda of like queen cells.
     

  3. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I stole it, I kinda figured they needed a frame of eggs worse since they've been queenless for a few weeks. I'll stuff it in the freezer for now and give it back later.
     
  4. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    They need the pollen to raise brood. I'd give it back to them ASAP...
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I've got a few hives that have almost plugged out the bottom deeps with pollen, I mean 6 or 7 frames 80% covered in pollen. I have pulled a few now and then but I have had frames of pollen go moldy as well. Once it gets that way, if it's bad the bees don't ever seem interested in it and I sometimes have to scrape it all off.
     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Frame of eggs

    I would be interested to know what happens to your (test) frame of eggs. There is a chance that there will be no queen cells.
     
  7. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    I just re-read your post... ...I missed that the hive "ISN'T queenright".

    A queenless colony definately needs eggs more than pollen. If the brood box is completely full of pollen and honey stores, then I'd say you were right to trade it out for a frame of eggs.

    If it is a strong hive otherwise, I would be willing to pull whatever is needed to keep them on fresh frames of eggs.

    Though given PerryBees comments about storage of pollen frames, you might consider slipping it into a queen-right hive sooner rather than later. Even if frozen, the bees may reject it for whatever reason they choose (freezer burn, etc.). It'd be a shame to risk wasting it.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    well i hate to be another 'poopy head'......:lol:
    i'm with eddy and paul about the frame of pollen, especially if it was the only pollen feed? i might add, you will probably be giving it back to them at some point if you added a frame of eggs to a queenless colony, or they might just spite you and stuff another frame entirely full of pollen:lol:
    freezing it is a good idea:grin:

    whoops, see a few replies, when i started my post it was soon after perry's reply, too many distractions in my household....anyway, i did catch the part about being queenless. freezing a frame of pollen, just make sure it's wrapped up tight, double plastic, no air, it should be fine, thaw if before giving it back. good to go!
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2012
  9. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    Well, I went back to put the frame back and looked through the frames and I had 3 frames mostly full of pollen, i'll just give it to another queenright hive that could use a little help from the pollen.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if you reared some queens such a frame has significant value. at one time I would have set in the freezer and the first graft I made it would go into a 'swarm box' with two or three like kind frames, six pounds of bees and 50 to 100 grafted cells.

    beyond this specific utilitarian end.... by and large such frames you DO NOT want to have at the center positionS of the brood nest. at the least you want to shuffle these towards the outside of the box and have some empty drawn comb at the center for the queen to lay in. the real problem with pollen bound frames is 1) the hive uses pollen up slowly and 2) unlike honey the bees don't really move pollen to get it out of the way.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    ""beyond this specific utilitarian end.... by and large such frames you DO NOT want to have at the center positionS of the brood nest. at the least you want to shuffle these towards the outside of the box and have some empty drawn comb at the center for the queen to lay in. the real problem with pollen bound frames is 1) the hive uses pollen up slowly and 2) unlike honey the bees don't really move pollen to get it out of the way.""

    Good info there.

    If they raise a new queen, 4 frames of pollen is NOT excessive. Just keep them to the outside as Tec said above.
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    This explains some of my problems.


    Iddee said :"If they raise a new queen, 4 frames of pollen is NOT excessive. Just keep them to the outside as Tec said above. "
    This answers a few more.
     
  13. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Pearls of wisdom. No doubt, if we stay with beekeeping long enough, we will be referring back to the answers in this thread. Thank goodness for search capabilities.