What To Do With Excess Sugar Syrup Stores in Super

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by litefoot, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    What happens if you still have syrup stored in a super and the nectar flow starts in the Spring? And I want to use the valuable (empty) drawn comb in the super for honey storage. I can't spin it out because the syrup will be crystalized. If it's warm enough and I move the super to the bottom of the hive before the nectar flows, will they move the sugar up into the brood area?
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    How much did you feed last fall?and how much honey was in the hive before you started feeding?
    just because the stores in the hive have crystallized dose not mean it is stored sugar syrup as honey will also crystallize. The syrup will have been stored in the center frames of the top brood box. so the out side frames should contain honey and could be extracted after warming the frames and dissolving the crystals
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I wouldn't take the risk of getting syrup mixed with honey. If the honey flow is on, the bees will build the combs they need as fast as it comes in. Give them new frames, preferrably with foundation (to direct them to build worker-sized cells, not worker cells that are generally built for storage) and save the frames with syrup for the next time you need to feed. HOWEVER, the liklihood that they would move the syrup from down below in the brood nest, to the storage supers up above, is quite minimal.
     
  4. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    Apis,
    Last year was my first attempt at prepping for the winter. After extacting 2 supers of honey, I added back one medium (now empty and drawn) super on top of the two brood boxes. I wanted to make sure they'd have enough winter feed, so after the flow and before the cold set in, I fed them until they mostly filled the super with syrup. So I'm pretty sure the super in question is all syrup.

    Thanks, ef. My thought was to have the bees move the syrup up into the brood area by placing the syrup-filled super below the brood boxes. It's probably a crazy idea. I want to have as much empty drawn comb as possible ready for the flow. Maybe saving them is the best solution.
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I am going to perhaps be faced with a similar situation (got some exposure to hopguard) and was thinking about putting the supers down below the brood box and scratching it heavily. Someone recommended dipping the comb in water as well after scratching, will help in having them move it up. As long as there are not honey supers at the top of the stack I think it would be worth a try.
     
  6. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I have some uncapped honey frames I saved from last year. I didn't feel comfortable extracting them. I am going to put them in two packages I ordered. Perhaps you need to expand, too? :)

    (flimsy excuse, I know, but that's my justification!)
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    for all that fed a way to much syrup last fall and have boxes full of stored syrup that is a hassle to store till next fall and keep the hive beetles wax moths and ants wasps mice ect. out of, plus you loose the use out of the super for honey storage. Extract it and mark it as syrup honey and use the suppers for honey this year and feed the syrup honey back to the bees in the fall with out the extra super on the hive.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    litefoot,
    i'm with ef, pull and save those sugar syrup frames for a nectar dearth or fall feeding....pull any frame in a medium super you suspect has sugar syrup in it and store it for feed frames. give the girls, as you said, empty drawn comb to fill for those frames you intend to extract. my opinion, do not put the syrup filled frames/super below the brood box.

    apis, from time to time i store entire frames, of honey and pollen, not sugar syrup....just have to be diligent about problems associated with our local areas to store these properly without the problems associated in our areas....
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    River normally I would agree on saving the frames for next winter. Why cause the bees to do extra work restoring and recapping, but his post
    "Apis,
    Last year was my first attempt at prepping for the winter. After extacting 2 supers of honey, I added back one medium (now empty and drawn) super on top of the two brood boxes. I wanted to make sure they'd have enough winter feed, so after the flow and before the cold set in, I fed them until they mostly filled the super with syrup. So I'm pretty sure the super in question is all syrup."
    suggests to me that he is using standard lang's for the brood and now has a complete box of Dadant syrup. He has come to the realization that he will not need the full Dadant on the hive for winter feed. The 6 1/4 frames will not work trying to put then in a Lang box and the frames could be used to store honey in this year if they were empty. In this case I would extract and save it to fed back for next winter so the bees can store it in the top brood box where it should be.
     
  10. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    OK thanks everyone for your thoughtful replies. I would like to use the drawn medium frames for honey storage this year and extracting sounds like a good option...if the syrup isn't crystalized. As I considered what to do, it occured to me that if I were using all medium boxes for brood and honey supers, I could just move the syrup frames down into the brood chamber. Hmmm, something to think about. Anyway, lesson learned about syrup in honey supers.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a litefoot snip....
    My thought was to have the bees move the syrup up into the brood area by placing the syrup-filled super below the brood boxes. It's probably a crazy idea. I want to have as much empty drawn comb as possible ready for the flow. Maybe saving them is the best solution.

    tecumseh....
    actually this is a classical manipulation that most folks no longer employ.... basically you place the super full of feed at the bottom slot, somewhat scratch the capping (at least the center two or three frames) to give them a bit of a push in regards to uncapping and you them place a full box of foundation right at the top of the stack. if you do this early enough then the bottom super of feed get largely consumed in producing brood and you get an extra box of foundation pulled at the top of the stack. <you would want to do this ahead of any substantial nectar flow... the 'larger' idea here being the bees do not like the honey right at their front door and will use or move it to remove the increased possibility of robbing.
     
  12. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    apis i hear what you are saying, i sometimes think in terms of the amount of equipment i myself have on hand. extraction is a good option or as tec's old method or likewise, putting it on top, and scratching the combs to 'induce' the bees to clean it out, to store in the brood deeps, but done before a flow goes on. (tec's method i would fear robbing, but have never done it). i also think in terms of the dearth's we have experienced. last year, a majority of my honey supers were left on to feed the bees through the summer. i also don't like to haul out and set up extraction for one super, alot of hoo-hah for me :lol: (i don't own a smaller extractor).