what to do with frames after extracting

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by pistolpete, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I plan on harvesting my honey in about 3 weeks. I have two deep supers. One is already capped, the other about 1/2 capped. After I am done extracting I'm not sure if I should put the wet frames back on the hive or set them outside for the bees to clean. I only have one hive and no other apiaries within a couple of miles, so I am not worried about encouraging robbing. If I put the wet supers back on will they clean them or proceed to fill them again. Obviously the supers will have to be removed for winter and I want their two deep broods packed as full with stores as possible. also, is there a way to separate the wax and honey from the capping and still have usable honey? When I read about heating, boiling, or solar melters, I don't get a clear picture on whether the separated honey is good for anything or not.
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Place the super with the wet frames on the hive--ABOVE--an inner cover with a hole. The bees will dry out the cells and replace the honey in the available cells below the cover.
    wet frames when stored need much more protection than dry frames. Cleaning them up from inside the hive is a much calmer operation than having them do it outside (besides, you really can't know whether or not there are other bees within flying distance).

    Honey separated by heating is "good for anything". Not as good as unheated honey, but still good. Of course the quality is affected more the more (hotter/longer) it is heated. But even if not top quality for selling or your own use, you can use it to feed the hives, or to make mead.
     

  3. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I usually just set my 'wets' back on a hive and in about a day all are very clean and could be removed. we do have a large problem with wax moth here so generally (and almost without exception) I leave these on the hive until the weather cool off and the wax moth are less of a threat (we can have wax moth present here 12 months of the year).
     
  5. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    So just to be clear...I have two deeps and two medium supers on right now. If the top super is filled and I extract(although I will be scraping the comb because we don't have an extractor yet) the honey do I then put an inner cover above the 1st medium super and place the extracted/empty super on top of that and then put another inner cover on the 2nd super with the telescoping lid over that.....? Wooh, hopefully that is understandable. Thanks Halley
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Halley, you got it right. I guess I should have mentioned the second cover that goes on above the super with the wet combs, under the telescoping roof.
     
  7. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I just put the extracted or scraped frames back in the hive for easy cleanup/rebuilding.
    I leave them below the inner cover.
    After careful observation, the bees will first fill their brood chamber with the necessary stores and when that is full they move up and store more nectar in the honey supers.
    I do use queen excluders in an attempt to keep the queen out of the supers while they are being cleaned out.
    I also just leave them on the hive until the cooler weather kicks in and I'm putting the bees to bed for the winter.
    I have also observed that the hives with solid bottom boards do a better job of utilizing the entire 2 bottom deeps vs the hives with screened bottom boards. Those hives would rather abandon the bottom deep and move up to the top deep and "chimney" into my honey supers; hence the queen excluders.
    All hives are in direct sunlight and we've had temps of 100+ this year without incident to the hives.
     
  8. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I learned the hard way not to put frames to be cleaned up outside the hive. Every red wasp, flys and yellow jackets, sweat bees, and you name it will be there and there will be robbing. Keep it inside the hive. Don't leave the empty frames n there to long though as any area that the bees are not occupying will be open for wax moths to come in. Blah, I hate those things.
     
  9. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. great stuff to know. Now all I have to do is restore my extractor, build a bee escape, make some buckets with honey gates, set up filtering equipment, find enough containers for 100 pounds of honey, and build a solar melter. Sure, along with 3 little kids and working 6 days a week, that should be no problem. Maybe I should just let the bees keep the honey :)
     
  10. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    pp, you should have all that done by the day-after-tomorrow.:lol:
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Eat comb honey and forget the rest. :thumbsup:
    And while you are sitting back on the chair sucking out the honey, enjoy the children. They grow up and out too fast---before you know it you'll have too much time on your hands. :grin:
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    That long? Must be taking some time off. :rolling:
     
  13. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Just an update on this thread. I proceeded as planned. I ended up with three full deeps of honey. So after extracting I put on one box with the nicest frames, then a cover board, then the remaining two boxes and a top cover. That was about four days ago. Today I went to remove the "cleaned" frames, only to find that the bees have started drawing and filling them again. I don't want bits of honey scattered over thirty frames, so I added an empty box on top of the first super, then a bee escape and then the top two boxes. Hopefully this works. I did not have a chance to check the first super, so I will do that tomorrow, just to make sure it's not full already.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a pistolpete snip...
    I don't want bits of honey scattered over thirty frames

    tecumseh:
    well I certainly don't know much about Canadian bees but...... the girls are much more organized that that here. they might use 2 or 3 frames in the lowest box but I have never seen bees disorganized enough to randomly try to fill 3 supers. even when the do put something in those 2 or 3 center frames come the first slow down in the flow this is also the first honey to be consumed (that is unsealed honey on the edges of the hive bodies is consumed before any capped honey is consumed).
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Tecumseh is very right. It's highly unlikely that the bees would randomly try to fill 3 supers.
    Just a thought: could it be that you had left some uncapped cells on the frames you returned for cleaning? If so, while cleaning remaining honey from the extracted cells, the bees would leave the capped cells alone and they would stand out as if rebuilt and refilled.
     
  16. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Yes, true, the re-filling of the frames is not random. They are favoring the center frames and a couple that were not 100% extracted. In the summer I'd let them proceed, but we only have two or three weeks of decent weather left. I checked the bottom super today and they have that about 60 to 80% filled. I hope they get it capped before frost. If not, I plan on leaving the super on as winter stores, even though it seems a little excessive to leave them with 140 lbs.

    Interesting side note, the triangle bee escape does not seem to be working to get the bees out of those two top supers. Today there were nearly as many in there as yesterday. Is that due to the cool temperatures?
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    That might be counterproductive in your northern climate. Remember not only the honey in the partially filled super but the added volume of space the bee's will have to warm. If the honey you are adding is truly in excess of their expected needs, adding the super will only increase the amount of honey they'll need. :???:
     
  18. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I was under the impression that bees do not keep the whole hive warm, just their cluster volume. I suppose I could store the "unfinished" super inside and pop it on it the spring instead of feeding sugar.
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    The cluster is where the warmth is produced and where it is at its best, but physics will be physics---heat escapes (that is, it goes from where it is warmer to where it is cooler, usually rising). The larger the cool area (and the less well it is insulated) the more and the faster heat escapes. It's just like heating a house in the winter---a large house requires more heat energy to stay warm, and if the doors are open it gets lost even faster, requiring more heat energy to stay warm.
    You might want to read some posts on preparing hives for winter.
    Here's one link:
    http://www.beekeepingforums.com/threads/1525-Another-Winterizing-Question?highlight=Omie+insulation