What to do?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ablanton, Aug 24, 2013.

  1. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Found this supersedure cell today . . .

    IMAG0341.jpg

    Also found the queen . . .

    IMAG0342.jpg

    This is a queen that I bought in early July to make a split with. I didn't do anything. If they are superseding, I'm sure they have good reason. But can a new queen really make it this late in the season? The drone count is already getting low in my hives. We've had almost no Summer this year, so I wouldn't be surprised by an early Fall.
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    That is the million dollar question You hate to see a queen replaced after spending good money for her. But if she is failing you don't want her heading up the colony going into winter. By the time the cell emerges and starts to lay it will be in the middle of September and they will need a lot of brood to have an adequate supply of bees to survive the winter.
    There could be a strong posibility that the "No Summer" has kept the bees from supporting her with all the resources she needed, and the superseding is a result of the environment in the hive this year and has nothing to do with the queen.
    I would defure my discusion for another 3 weeks. Either way you are going to have to bolster the hive with bees from another colony. So do it now let the nuc raise the a new queen and keep the original queen by given her a frame of brood and some bees, feed them both wait and see if the emerged queen starts to lay? The bought queen starts to preform? Or whether both are a bust and use the bees to help a hive that has a chance to make it thru the winter.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Can you give more information. How strongs the hive. Hows the laying pattern of the queen. Are they in 2 deeps etc.:thumbsup:
     
  4. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I did the split the first week of July, so I wouldn't call them strong. I moved them from a nuc to an 8-frame deep at the beginning of August. Six frames are drawn. Laying pattern, while not the best of my hives, is not bad. Of the five splits I did in July, I'd rank this one 3rd or 4th in performance.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have also seen cells like this torn down, or what is inside may be nothing. Just the 1 cell?
    I am also curious, in picture 1 there seems to be a number of capped brood cells that are indented, or concave, rather than domed or convex. Maybe open up 1 or 2 to see whats going on inside those.
     
  6. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Good eyes Perry, I didn't catch that till you called our attention to them. It's nice having an official inspector here. :thumbsup:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    my thinking would follow along with Perrys. I am guessing??? the location of the cells is on the outside frame away from the primary cluster.

    one rule that you can make book on (well at least according to some authorities like Seeley) is all queen cells do not hatch and all those that do will not evolve into laying queens.

    another rule not defined by any authority (that is suggest at this time only by little old me) is 'the source and the timing of obtaining mated queens' is likely 'the decision' you should focus the most attention to if you want to successfully pursue beekeeping for any duration of time.
     
  8. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You have guessed correctly (and I doubt it was a guess :wink:). It was, indeed, on the outside frame which was not completely drawn.


    Not sure that I follow you. Are you saying that I may have picked a poor time to introduce the new queen when splitting, and that could cause supersedure? Or, did I just use a queen that was mated at the wrong time of year and that is why they didn't like her? I got this queen the first week of July, and I'm pretty sure she was hatched and mated in mid-to-late June.
     
  9. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, just the one cell. Unfortunately, I probably won't have a chance to get back into this hive until Friday or Saturday. I'll take a closer look at the brood.
     
  10. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've got a hive that I recently requeened with a queen from a local treatment-free breeder that is superseding her too. I noticed the capped cells 11 days ago, I'll go back this weekend and see what is going on. I figured I wouldn't get in mother nature's way.