Beekeeping Forums banner

What type of bees do you keep.

  • Italians

    Votes: 19 44.2%
  • Germans

    Votes: 1 2.3%
  • Carniolans

    Votes: 8 18.6%
  • Caucasians

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Russians

    Votes: 6 14.0%
  • Buckfasts

    Votes: 3 7.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 22 51.2%
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got started on all this and like many of you I did some extensive research and reading before my first bees arrived. I think my toughest decision was what kind of bee to go with. I ultimately ended up choosing Russians. I'm curious to see how many people keep each type of bee and then please make a post as to why you keep that type of bee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
I started with a package of Italian bees 4 years ago, because that was recommended in beeschool and that's the type that were being conveniently delivered in my area, heh. But I'm convinced I have "mutts" now.

In my original hive locations, there was a wild colony in the tree in my front yard, and I saw at least 5 swarms in the area every spring (not from my hive) and I know in recent years many local keepers have started getting some russian and some carniolans queens. With that many other types and unknown wild and kept colonies around, I often wonder how much my bee's genetics have changed.

However, my two hives now are both 'directly descended', through swarms and splits, from my very first package, so I imagine the vast majority of my hives' genetic makeup is still Italian.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
mutts.. all mine are mutts.... still most have a bit of italian accent <all very exotic sounding ladies.

truthfully all the responses here (or at least those that originate in the US) should be other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Mutts now from feral hives/swarms, started with Italtian queens in packages but they were replaced over time with locally (free flight) mated queens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Could the drone colonies genetics improve me and my neighboring beekeepers mutts? I put drone foundation in my best hives in hopes of having show dog quality drone mutts. Though one hive has become a drone lounge so I have pulled some drone frames. In bee school we were taught the beekeeper was the first line of defense from AHB. Sunkist are truly mite resistant and would like my mutts and neighboring mutts to have some of there DNA. Some of the Italian packages I got this year had dark queens in them. A friend from that region on Georgia said they call them Black Beauty's .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Tec, kinda with still had the Italian's I had in Upstate NY, lol bet the thief and the vandals would have new found respect for irate bees lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,281 Posts
Mutts, i really doubt there are any pure bred bees in the U.S. of A. Of course i guess i could call the queens i raise from my hives, pure bred Brooks Queens.:lol: Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
I just started this year. The nuc I bought had Carniolian "cross" queens which I guess means they let their queens mate normally and so they have little control on the other set(s) of chromosomes. The package looks italian but the queen is supposed to be Carniolian so I'll see a switch here in the next month or two. Swarm hive are purebred mutts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
I start every line I can find in Florida for the queen rearing class in July. The rest of the year they are all Italian Cordovan (Aurea) or Buckfast, Belgian Buckfast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
I have been getting swarms and cutouts all up and down the west coast of florida, they are all mutts and now they are all breading together so now i have super mutts:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
Mutts in two yards, and pure bred mutts (buckfast) in third.:wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,048 Posts
I just got started on all this and like many of you I did some extensive research and reading before my first bees arrived. I think my toughest decision was what kind of bee to go with. I ultimately ended up choosing Russians. I'm curious to see how many people keep each type of bee and then please make a post as to why you keep that type of bee.
good thread gator and a great poll,
i keep russian hybrids, winter hardy, very conservative on winter stores= 0 emergency feeding and minimal spring feeding. they build up a little slower in spring, but explode when they do, making for good divides or nucleus hives, and these 'new hives' build quickly with russian queens/cells harvested. very hygenic, tidy, bees, low to zero mite population, and very good honey producers. russkies have some management quirks and characteristics different from other lines. i have been keeping them since first available in the u.s.a., they survive and thrive in my climate. you will like them.

btw, my veil is off to you for doing research:hi:

:grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
guyross writes:
Some of the Italian packages I got this year had dark queens in them

tecumseh:
if you go to glenn apiary web site they have a nice explanation of their product including the various italian bees they sell. one variation in the italian bee is a black variety that looks quite a bit like a Carnolian (which is really not the same thing as a new world Carnolian) which is a evolutionary cousin of the Italian honey bee.

there has been no live bees imported into the US since the 1920... all the stiff brought in between then and now has been in the form of drone sperm or eggs. the resources required to then make queens and hives from these takes live bees.... so from the get go all the new varieties are of mixed linage. in the current time frame most of these resources are of significant italian origin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Started with Buckfasts 10 yrs ago; bought 7 hives of Italians off a retiring beek; have retrieved swarms and bees in building and have requeened only twice w/Italians, so I'd have to say mutts as well.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top