What would be the best setup or approach as backyard beekeeping?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping Biology' started by gustavo_m_2000, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    I live in a residential area where there lots of trees etc and pools. I have one of my own.

    I really want to help the bees as hobby, not looking to make money so I would like to be in control of May be two full hives, for obvious reasons, how can I control how much brood they would make or to keep it low in numbers, I don't want to bring up red flags by neighbors.

    the worse case scenario is to relocate them if needed.

    so how can I keep it in minimum scale activity?

    I just bought a complete deep hive with a Nuc hive and currently I have a bee trap that is going to be transfer to the Nuc as soon as I painted.

    I heard that I should paint the inside hive because it would last me longer! I ve reading yes and some people day no!


    New beekeeper in training! books,videos and forums
    thanks
     
  2. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Gustavo, I live in a rural area and checked with my neighbors for a couple of miles (maybe 5 or 6 residences :smile:) to make sure there was no problem with me keeping bees. Living in a residential area, you may first want to check the zoning laws and second, check if any neighbors have allergic reactions to stings. This is a very litigious nation.

    If you get an "all clear", the bees will determine the size. If you don't give them room, they'll probably swarm and you won't have to worry about building up. A person who used to post here had a tag line, "Bee are bees and do as they please."

    Paint the outside of the hive, not the inside. Painting where there is no danger of weathering will not increase the life of a hive, no more than painting the walls in your house increases the life of your siding.

    Walt
     

  3. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    Well I don't live in hoa, but my municipality has zero tolerance to bugs! that's the bad news the new good since I live in Florida, the Gov. few years back passed a law that supersedes any county ordinance against bees, due to the fact of the current problem with the collapse disorder with the bees, So I am leveraging on that new law and I didn't butter the rest!

    I joined the Florida Bee keepers Association for the same reason in case that I would need more help fighting this stupid laws, don't ask me where I live je je. South Florida.

    My plan b is to relocate them in rural place but the idea is to watch this beautiful creatures on the works.
    I do have someone with lots of space in case that it may need to.

    Understood with the paint makes sense, I guess you can trust what ever you see in you tube!

    thanks for your input.

    Also was thinking just keep rearing queens with nucs, all year round so I would keep a minimal populations of bees and keeps me under radar with no so many!

    This are feral bees they are on the wild, I capture two weeks ago with a bee trap! lemongrass makes miracles even in November!

    Gustavo
     
  4. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    These might be africanized bees if they swarmed this time of year, even in FL. Bee careful.
     
  5. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    They are really gentle, when I feed them! but the only way to find out is through DNA!

    I hope not!
     
  6. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    small hives tend to be pretty gentle all the time. Test will be next spring when they start expanding. Just be careful. Nothing to worry about now, but if they turn mean be prepared to kill the hive particularly since you live in a residential area.
     
  7. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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  8. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    ok, understood!

    I just painted my Nuc hive, I would do the transfer from my trap to the Nuc, that's scary!

    I am planning to attached whatever cumb they would have with the frames with rubber bands hopefully they would draw more new cumb.
     
  9. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    I was able to transferring them to my Nuc, It's a small bunch of bees like 100, I attached their cumb to my frames, now I would keep feeding them so they continue to draw comb.
    My untrained eyes could not get a glance of the queen, but she is somewhere there, since the left over from the trap waked into the Nuc hive without pushing them lol.

    I am still hopefull.
    I would like to make some pollen substitute!

    I think there is dearth of nectar around here. since they are keep coming or they are thirsty !
     
  10. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Nice start. Hope they do well
     
  12. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    Thanks, I've looking for soybean flour to make them some pollen party, by no luck finding in my groceries stores to boost them a little !
     
  13. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    To insure you do not have AHB for your first hive, you might consider a queen from Hawaii and then requeen those bees in early spring.

    Buy a small amount of pollen substitute from Mann Lake, dadant, Brushy Mountain or other bee supply house. Its easy and fast. I wouldn't use pollen sub now in my location, but it might work for you in Florida on such a small number of bees. Worth a try. :)
     
  14. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Look around for a local beekeeper and buy a patty or two from him.

    AFB is American Foulbrood. AHB - Africanized Honey bees
     
  15. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Yes, it was a typo camero7, thanks for pointing that out (I fixed it) and for suggesting he get in touch with an experienced beekeeper in his area...Great advice! :)
     
  16. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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    to give you an update,My small swarm died, on the last cold front, today I went to clean the remnants of the cumb and found two Beatles I killed them but, I think this bees were infected or sick perhaps, how two Beatles came to my new hive even when there was no cumb draw, just a small piece, that really sucks it make me wondering all this bees flying are sick with God knows what!

    some of these bees are flying to feed with the sugar syrup but if they are sick or carrying diseases is not good!

    I am very disappointed finding Beatles without having a real hive!

    Gus
     
  17. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Very hard to keep small swarms alive, they have to have enough bees to generate heat, and the queen doesn't lay in the winter. Wait for spring. I use beetle b gone I get from Beeweavers.com

    Gypsi
     
  18. gustavo_m_2000

    gustavo_m_2000 New Member

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