What would you do?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by srvfantexasflood, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    We have had two very nasty storms in the last week. Heavy rains and strong winds have had me wondering what would you do if a hive blew over in one of these storms. I know the bees would be REALLY MAD. Would the honey be ruined? Is there a chance the queen would be killed? I think the bees would probably stay with the honey, or would they?
    Is there a way to prevent this from happening? In our area, everyone puts bricks or rocks on top of the hive lids to keep them from blowing off.
    I ask all these questions because a storm last friday blew over a black walnut in the neighbor's yard. The tree was about 10ft. from my hive. What would I need to do if the hive had blown over or the tree knocked it over?
    Thanks for your imput.
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    There is a chance the queen could be killed if a hive topples over. I have had hives that have been knocked over in a storm. The bees will stay with the queen who will stay with the brood most of the time. The best thing to do is wait till morning suit up and put the hive back together. Give it a few days to calm down then go in and look to see evidence of a queen. You could put tie downs on the hive but I find a good heavy brick set on a level hive that does not rock on its stand best. The will with stand quite a bit of wind. as for the honey being ruined. If it was capped and not broke open it will be fine. if it was uncapped then they will just have to work a little longer to get the moisture content down. before they cap it.
     

  3. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I don't know how well it works but the last time we had any thought of preparing for a big storm we just pounded heavy rebar about 5 ft into the ground and curled the tops over in an upside down u shape, then used rachet straps to tie down the hives. We use bricks and try to keep the hives away from trees that would fall onto them other than that.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    not so uncommon here.

    if caught quick enough the bee are really mad but salvageable. once robbing set in there is a good chance the hive(s) will be lost.

    here most hives that turn over tend to be extremely light at the bottom of the stack.