What would you do?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by RE Jones, Apr 23, 2012.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I removed an existing hive from a mobile home on the 4th of this month. I thought that I got the queen as several bees were fanning like she was in the box.

    I checked this hive on the 21st and saw no sign of the queen and no more capped brood. There were several combs that came from the hive that were covered in brood. I did not see any eggs and the bees were packing in nectar and pollen?? They are in an eight frame box and have covered six of the frames.

    I plan on checking them again on the 27th, this will be 23 days after I put them in a hive. If I do not see any capped brood by then, I will assume that there is no queen or she is a dud.

    I do have a nuc with a mated queen that I can combine with this hive.

    This sound like a plan??
    Robert
     
  2. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    If there is no sign of the queen, simply steal a frame of eggs/brood from either the nuc or another hive (if you have one) and let them raise their own.

    You are early enough in the season to not have to worry about the loss. The nuc might need to relieve some congestion anyway...
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    When you did the cut out and had brood in your boxes, were there any eggs?

    They could have made a new queen, did you check for queen cells? If you did not get the queen and they did make a new queen, 23 days is not long enough to see eggs yet, she would be taking her mating flights by then. I would give them at least 30 to 35 days from the day you did the cut out to look for eggs. Queen cells are sometimes hard to see if there are a bunch of bees standing on the comb.
     
  4. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    G3, if there were any eggs, I did not see them. There was plenty of brood in the hive when removed.

    There is now some drone cells in the hive that were not there and no queen cells on any of the comb. I'm pretty sure with the drone cells, that I do not have a queen. This hive does not act any different than any of my others, and I have heard that when they are queenless, they are a little more testy.

    Robert
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Maybe the queen that you captured (indicated by the fanning you saw) is unmated (indicated by the sealed drone brood) or else you've got laying workers (indicated by your not finding a queen).
    I like P. Turley's idea. Give the hive a frame with eggs (and brood that with it). To reduce the possibility of problems from laying workers or an unseen dud queen, shake the bees off the frames about 10-15 feet in front of the hive, return the bare frames to the hive and let the bees find their way home.