What's happening here?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ggmom, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. ggmom

    ggmom New Member

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    I just went out to our hives and found a ton of them hanging out by the entrance.

    I'm thinking they are too warm?? It was in the 90s today and yesterday. Should I tilt the top a bit? We hope to get some screened bottoms, but they are solid at the moment.

    This was happening on just one hive--the other appeared normal. They sit side by side.

    Thanks! Seems like the more I learn about our bees, the more I realize I don't know!!
     

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  2. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    They're just sitting on the front porch and cooling off, just something they do. A little ventilation would help, but it's probably not necessary. I shim my telescoping covers up with a 3/4" piece of scrap wood on top of the inner cover, but down here 90's is a "cold front". :D

    Looks like you have at last 2 boxes on, you might want to remove your entrance reducer.

    Walt
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    That isn't a ton. This is a ton. Open your entrance and until it looks worse than this one, don't worry. They are fine. When they cover the whole bottom box, you may want to add another box.
     

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  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Iddee writes:
    That isn't a ton. This is a ton.

    tecumseh:
    looks more like about 6# to me. :eek:
     
  5. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    iddee says it's a ton, so I suppose it's a ton, in a manner of speaking. :lol:
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Closer to a ton than Mom's. :D
     
  7. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    it is kind of amazing ain't it Iddee the kind of stuff that folks worry over???

    I guess it is really more the uncertainty they are responding to than anything else?
     
  9. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I see by the pictures that you still have an entrance reducer on. Not knowing the circumstances about how long you have had your colony, maybe you should remove the entrance reducer. That would allow for a little more air flow and the bees would be able to cool down the hive.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Tec, the only thing on earth that people fear is "the unknown". Once they understand something, the fear will go away. A healthy respect may remain for the dangerous things, but the fear itself will dissipate.
     
  11. ggmom

    ggmom New Member

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    Thanks for all of the replies! Internet issues prevented me from responding earlier.

    It's true that all of the unknowns are intimidating--I really appreciate the time and information shared by the fine folks on these forums!

    Now I have more questions! One of our hives seemed a little weaker than the other and I think we've figured out why. Looks to me like they have replaced their queen. Am I correct in thinking this is an empty queen cell?
    [attachment=2:lffo8qr0]beehiveS.JPG[/attachment:lffo8qr0]


    And these are drone cells?
    [attachment=1:lffo8qr0]hiveS2.JPG[/attachment:lffo8qr0]

    Last question (for now :lol: ). Three of the frames had holes in the foundation...why?
    [attachment=0:lffo8qr0]hiveS3.JPG[/attachment:lffo8qr0]

    Thanks again!!
     

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  12. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    what your seeing is a queen cup. Or a practice cup bees build them in the hive often and wont tell us why. It is also common for them to chew holes in the fondation to make communication holes and to move the wax where needed.
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You are right on the drone cells, tho. They are the bullet shape domed ones along the edge. The holes are most times made when the flow is light or non-existent. They don't do it so much during a heavy flow.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    from what I can see picture 1 looks like a freshly started superscedure or emergency queen cell. I cannot see down into the cell to see if their is royal jelley and a larvae there but my best guess right now is that there is both.

    picture two is a row of drone cells on the top then a small patch of worker brood and under that lots of pollen. the stored pollen has likely limited the worker brood on that side of the frame.

    picture three the workers are scavenging wax from a frame of foundation to use somewhere else. this might suggest there are not so many wax making bees (12 days old or so) in the box and they have a need for wax now.

    that's my story and I'm stickin' too it.