What's the standard protocol when a rogue bee comes at you?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by juntjoo, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    If you've seen my other thread(s) I'm totally new if even; A hive moved into a structural column on the side of my house which I initially intended to remove but ultimately decided to keep for fun, health, whatever, but I don't have time to get to it to transport it to a hive box,

    so in the meantime it's been growing and I guess they sent this guy out to protect the hive even though I was like 40 ft away and it starts trying to land on my head and instinctively I started flailing my arms and running around and apparently they think it's a game you want to play and they sure oblige. Well it never got me but succeeded in chasing me away from my house.

    Is it possible it's scoping out a new area to move the hive or something? I wasn't even in the vicinity. As you know about hurricane Irma, she is headed my way right about tonight, so I wonder if that might have something to do with it. It's happened a couple times before. I've read a little about them getting aggressive during this season or when preparing to move among other reasons.

    But regardless of the reason, I've read that one shouldn't get excited when approached but how do you know what exactly their intentions are when they're about to land on your head? Last I remembered they sure are skilled and quick at stinging. Could I try to let it land on me then smash it? Should I just 'be a man' and let the single bee sting me and get used to it? If a few of you suggest so I just may challenge myself lol. I've been getting pretty immune to mosquitos, I'm sure I could get used to bees. They're just a bit more scary.

    How should I handle these random rogue bees? I want to get back to what I was doing lol.
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    LOL....that sounds almost like me....my instinct is to swat with my arms, but I have managed to try and not move..I think those bees are like female drivers..they hit everything infront of them...im thinking when they get their flight direction they dont change if you get infront of them, or they may just be a rogue bee chasing you away..either way I had to get use to bees just landing on me as I worked on the hive and realize they dont always want to sting me..if your not allergic , im not , then getting stung is no fun, ive been stung a bunch of times, but its not that bad really, what I think is worse is the thinking they are going to sting me...
     
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  3. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Yes, you're exactly right about that. It's just the thought plus they're kinda scary the way they go about it, like they've got nothing to lose in their suicide mission.

    And I'm only as allergic as I haven't been recently stung I guess, and I don't usually welcome it, so it's been about a sting a year, which is kinda allergic for me. So I should probably welcome a couple more. But gosh is it scary when you're just going about your business then suddenly...
     
  4. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    lol..when I mean if your allergic to bee stings , is that you dont need an epi pen because you swell up enough for your throat to close off?...just a little swelling where they sting you if your not allergic and that goes away over night..
     
  5. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Well mine won't go away over night, they're like fire ant stings but no epi pen needed
     
  6. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    You were most likely getting "bumped" as a warning. The bees know that this is most effective if they go for your head and face. At 40' I think you will have to move them or give up going that way, that's pretty extreme defensiveness.

    Unfortunately, if you get stung, the pheromone released will recruit other bees to the party! It helps to quickly scrape off the stinger and smoke the site of the sting and around yourself if you have a source of smoke.
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Bumping warnings I yield and walk or run but don't flail, serious pursuit I go in my dark shed, the bee heads back for the light. Stings I can treat right away, dab of bleach, scrape do not tweezer stinger out, then a dab of bleach on the sting, maybe one benadryl, rarely swell up. I swell pretty good if I can't do the bleach right away. baking soda water may work, but won't make those funny white spots on your clothes.
     
  8. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    ill try the bleach trick next sting, I heard vinegar also worked to alleviate the sting and swelling, usually I dont get stung, the last time my buddy was helping me because of my hip surgery and when handing me some frames to put back into storage he handed me one with a bee still on it and of course I didnt have gloves on at the time and grabbed the frame right where mr bee was sitting and wamo..a sting on my finger, my hand swelled up a little over nite, it took a day for it to go away..I thanked him for that after he stopped laughing..made me think who needs enemies with friends like that..LOL...
     
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  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I tried vinegar, didn't work near as well. and for aquatics, sometimes I would have a bleach bucket on my truck, tablespoon to a gallon, and that helped but straight bleach is the fastest. Plain, no scent.
     
  10. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    cool, thanxs for that tip..
     
  11. eltalia

    eltalia New Member

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    G'day.. from language used I assume you are located above Lat.28N so it
    is too late in your year to do any more than wait till the near end of winter
    to plan for giving that colony a home.
    In the meantime, wear a hat... I keep my collection by the yard door and rarely
    venture outside to the yard without one on. Eyeware helps also, with clear lens
    being best. An inquistive bee - and usually that is all that is intended - will always
    go bump tbe crown or the eyes, it's just what they do.
    And yes, if bees are going to be your thing then resolve must become your
    backstop. For Apis.* stinging a mammal once is the only thing they can do, the
    rest is bluff, or death throes (sp?).
    As habit I carry a penknife at all times. When stung - not IF - there is maybe 10
    seconds to scrape the barb out to deny injection. In that time a frame/box can be
    put aside - not dropped - and the knife deployed to remove the barb. The site will
    then sting for maybe 30secondslonger, learn to ignore that. For hits in delicate
    spots as eyebrow above eyelash, back of the ear, a lip, and crotch hits, it pays to
    also apply an icecube direct for up to 2 mins... so you need a few cubes.
    When working boxes the correct amount of smoke for those bees is essential in
    maintaining both yours and the bees demeanour. The correct amount is best worked
    out by having all other conditions at an optimum when learning. A clear mild sunny
    morning after the pollon run starts (0900hrs here) and no more than 10knots of
    breeze. Master that and then the boundries can be pushed into days and times which
    are not so conducive but in which bees can be worked with the correct amount of
    smoke, on the day.
    When bees do really light up - and it will happen - a short break does no harm. Where
    they go feral and bomb your hands and back do retreat to some close by shrubbery, or
    lie down nearby.

    The thing to take away here is - never swat, never run and never use more than smoke
    as a line of first defence, yours.
    As I read here, it is so true tbere are way more bees of fast disposition to defend when
    the word gets out - you do not stand a chance if you do happen to be lucky enough to
    "swat" a few.

    Bill