What's your Winterizing Way

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by brooksbeefarm, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Went to 5 outyards yesterday (temp. 65F), found 4 hives short on stores, so i took 2 to 3 frames of honey from strong hives (out of the middle of top supers) and gave to the weak hives.I could have taken another super of honey off the strong hives (when i was robbing) but left them for this purpose,i also poured 2 gal. of 2 to 1 syrup in the top feeders of the weak hives. If we continue to have warm spells (in the 60's) i'll go back and give more syrup, if not, i'll do the mountaincamp method and keep a close eye on them. One hive i knew was queenless, i went through it 2 more times yesterday and found only drone brood and no queen, they still had a good population and around 35 lbs. of honey.I took the hive 50 ft. away and shook them out, i put the honey super on a weak hive and brought the brood box home to spray the comb with BT. This sounds cruel, but they would have died anyway and this way they have a chance to find a new home? All the other hives are heavy as lead and workers pulling in pollen, i put mouse guards on and a rock on the top cover. Now the waiting game begins.:roll: Jack
    ​PS. I Just thought this may give some new beekeepers some idea's,i never seen any sign of disease,heavy mite load or shb problems.:thumbsup:
     
  2. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Are you wintering with one deep and a super, or two deeps and a super? I winter with two deeps and 2" styrofoam over the inner cover. Also reduce the entrances to about 1" wide and leave a ventilation hole (emergency exit) 3/8"x3/8" up top.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I have several hive set ups, i didn't plan it that way, it just turned out that way:roll:. It depends on the strength of the hive (population), i have 1 deep and 1 med.hives, 2 deeps, 2 deeps with a med., 3 or 4 med.for hives, and i have took 1 deep through the winter:thumbsup:. I keep a top feeder on all my hives year round with a notch on the bottom of it for a top entrance and ventilation, 1 in. by 3/8". The only time i take them off is to put a 3" shim on top so i can feed sugar, (mountain camp) usually in late Feb. or March if needed. In my area i can get by with 50 lbs of honey per hive, unless we have a bad winter? Everyone around here are saying we are going to have a bad one this winter.:eek: Jack
     
  4. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    My four mature hives have good stores. I am just going to let them be bees. Maybe I will open their hives on a warm day in late February. Until then, there will be zero intervention on my part. My two immature hives are both housed in two medium eight frame boxes and are being fed 2:1 sugar syrup until Mid November. That is the normal date of our first freeze. Then they will be left on their own through the winter. I have tried Mountain Camp and hard sugar candy, and my bees didn't touch them. Maybe they didn't need them. I don't know. I do know they didn't feed on either. In my old age, I've decided that I tend to make beekeeping too complicated. I'm just going to let them be bees.