When should I do my first inspection?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Spaztck, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. Spaztck

    Spaztck Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I got my Nuc this past Sunday, June 16. I took my hive body to the beekeepers house and he put the Nuc frames in. How long do I wait to do my first full inspection?
     
  2. dnburton4

    dnburton4 New Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm researching my behind off right now since I'm a new keeper too. Here is a link which may help you out. They talk about packaged bees in the video which is different than buying nucs but I thought the inspection process was explained well for unexperienced guys like me.
    http://www.honeybeesonline.com/blesson10.html
     

  3. pturley

    pturley New Member

    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You'd do well to take a peek in the hive this Saturday or Sunday.
    Keep in mind, you'll want to have a specific goal in mind any time you open a hive as it is said that it takes roughly 2 days for the bees to recover from the event.

    This weekend, you will be looking for young brood or eggs and possible emergency queen cells. If for some reason the queen was damaged during the move to your boxes and to your yard, the bees will immediately begin building emergency cells from existing day 3 larva in the middle of the brood.

    Once you pull an undrawn end frame, slowly pry the brood nest frames over to give yourself room to work, then carefully lift out a brood frame. If you see small C-shaped larva in the bottom of some cells, then all is well and you are done for the day.

    IF you see the queen on the frame removed or emergency queen cells, be particularly careful how you move and reset this frame in the hive.
    NOTE: Queen cups are not the same as queen cells (yet) and are common in a healthy hive.

    After that, you want to check on them at least once every 14 days (every 7 days in the spring for swarm prevention).

    Thus far this year I have checked my hives weekly (more or less).

    This weekend I have the following to check (4 hives, 3 nucs):

    • A single deep from a walk-away split that I need to confirm the queen is laying. I saw queen cell remnants and a young queen (apparently bred) last week.
    • The queen-right half of the split should likely be ready for a second deep.
    • Two nucs I need to check to see if they are ready to transfer to 10 frame boxes (one likely, one possibly).

    • My other hives, I just need to check populations and/or if they are ready for supers yet (one currently does).
     
  4. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Give them 10 days without any disturbig, if not they can leave the hive... Look if they bring pollen to the hive, if so they are working, if not they could migrate! I put a queen exluder between brood box and floor, so they will defently not migrate (without the queen they don´t go :)
     
  5. pturley

    pturley New Member

    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ORoedel, I am sure that your advice is sound with Southern bees with African influences.

    However, with mixed Italians, with brood on a number of frames they are not at all likely to abscond. A week out should be safe.
     
  6. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A Nuc is not likely to swarm or abscond. So if you don't get around to checking them for a couple of weeks nothing bad will happen. Once a week is a reasonable frequency to check your hive, not for the bee's benefit, but for yours. You have to learn somehow what the heck goes on in a hive. Keep in mind that there are negatives to inspections. Every time you inspect a hive you have a small but real chance of damaging your queen. Every time you inspect your hive, the bees will spend about a day working to repair the damage you have done. My mentor ( a third generation Beek) advocates disturbing the bees as little as possible. He goes thorough his hives maybe once or twice a year. All he really needs is a look at the landing board, the sticky board under the bottom screen, and a peek under the lid to know all he needs to know about a hive.

    You first decision to make will be when to add the second brood box. A healthy Nuc with supplemental sugar feeding should take 3 to 4 weeks to fill up the first box, but if they're a bit weak at the start they can take longer. When you see the bees have expanded to 8 of the frames in their first box, add the second.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    spaztck,
    7 days....and paul has some good advice......let us know how it goes, keep it simple, you don't need to find the queen , just evidence on the brood frames to determine she is there and laying or she is not laying.
     
  8. Spaztck

    Spaztck Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Okay, I have been in the top of the hive to check plenty of times. Those bees are so sweet and calm. I almost want to pet them. I was looking forward to my inspection. Today, I smoke them, in the entrance and at the top. Then I take off the top cover and smoke them again at the top. I have an extra empty box on, since I moved the entrance feeder to the top (had to cover it). I take off the top feeder. As soon as I go to remove the top piece of wax paper that was left from the pollen patty (no bees near it) about 50 bees come at me. Not a big deal, I am a beekeeper after all. I smoke a little more and remove one of the empty frames at the far side. I clearly hear a change in pitch to the buzzing, about a few hundred bees (probably more) come at me. I calmly walk away from the hive (right!!!!!ll....lol). I wait a few minutes and reassemble the hive in about three seconds. That was my official inspection!
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Know when to hold 'em :cool:
    Know when to fold 'em :sad:
    Know when to walk away :???:
    Know when to run! :shock: :thumbsup: :lol:
     
  10. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh NO, a Canadian Kenny Rogers.
    'Course, the beards the right color. :lol:
    (Sorry Perry, couldn't resist)
     
  11. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    that doesn't sound like calm bees to me. Usually a hive inspection on a full size colony results in about a dozen bees actually flying around the bee keeper. With a Nuc it should be even less. You need to avoid even the slightest banging of equipment and scraping noises. Do everything in super slow motion.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think ORoedel is speaking of a swarm or a package. Then he would be correct. A nuc, or nucleus hive, is a laying queen with brood and stores. It isn't going to abscond. ""migrate""
     
  13. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks Iddee, a nuc in my eyes is/was something new "reassembled" (queen, bees, combs of different origem...) in this state they can leave even with brood. Is it a stablizid colony, which was formed weeks ago, then sure they stay in Peace.
     
  14. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nucs can be made many different ways. I go into a strong hive and find the queen. I move her and 2 or 3 frames of brood, plus 2 frames of honey and pollen. Then I make sure I am leaving eggs for the hive to raise a new queen.

    Most reputable nuc sellers pull 3 frames of brood and one of honey and pollen, plus an empty frame for expansion. Then they introduce a mated queen and wait until her brood is capped before selling.

    There are also many not so reputable sellers selling lesser nucs.
     
  15. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sure Iddee, better to know well where and what you´r buying ;-) I could tell stories...
     
  16. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

    Messages:
    742
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I do not like to disturb a hive for at least two weeks after being installed. an exception woudl be a nuc that was purchased as a nuc and is already a functioning colony. Don't be surprised if you find they are superseding the queen when you do check. Start up may be slow due to this but it will pick up. I feed my bees until they are 20 frames strong. I consider 20 frames whether deep or med ( I do not use shallows) as full size hive. anything larger than that is better than full size.
     
  17. Lburou

    Lburou Member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I think you might find this link will help a lot to understand your bees and what you should do and why. HTH :)