When to relocate

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Well, my new bee yard just isn't cutting the mustard. Too much agriculture. (corn, soybeans) I liked that they get full sun till 5-7ish but too dang windy cause of the fields. Lost 2 hives out there as well. I want to move these last 2 hives off his property. When would be the best time to do this? I'll do it later in the evening , but should I wait later in the year? Let them finish out where they are? I'm starting to smell dirty socks in my hives so goldenrod must be starting to bloom.

    Also, I really don't what to say to this fella. He was all gun-ho to have bees back on his property.
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I wouldnt give up just yet. Soybeans often produce a lot of good honey. If they are getting goldenrod there should be other wildflowers in the ditches and rightaways. I have bee yards that one year will produce little and the next year I can get a bumper crop. I usually give a yard a couple 3 years to descide if It is going to be a viable yard before moving on:thumbsup:
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I have 3 hives in the middle of soybeans. They are filling up the hives faster than I can remove the honey. A guy about 10 miles from me has 30 hives in the middle
    of soybeans and they have from 3 to 5 supers sitting on top of each hive.

    Wonder if something else is going on?
     
  4. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Where are they located? I'm moving my hives there!
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    soybeans can be hit and miss. The same seed variety will vary on nectar production from year to year. I have gotten some great crops off soybeans and also been disappointed on the production in other years. Again I would keep them there at least another year. YOu didnt mention was these established producing hives when moved to the bee yard
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    crazy, what riverrat said, 'wouldn't give up yet' and his post's about the soybeans, and other plants; goldenrod and wildflowers, post #2. i typically get a great boost in honey production from the soybeans. might want to consider what he said about giving it another year before you move them out, plants change, and there will never be an ideal situation. every year it changes and every year is different. some good, some not so good. :grin:
     
  7. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I'm still debating. I went out a couple days ago to check on the 2 hives. Both full of bees and have 2 deeps. One has good honey stores. This hive I placed a super on several months ago. They have not touched it at all! I was hoping they would draw it out. The second hive has a good laying queen but they are slow to draw out the last several frames out of each deep. So, they don't have any stores what so ever. I've been feeding them all year.
     
  8. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    ​I have a very similar situation. taking sugar water like crazy but not drawing hardly any comb. Very frustrating.
     
  9. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Its hard to get bees to draw comb this time of year. Young bees are the ones who usually produce wax. With the brood slowing down this time of year the number of young bees in the hive is reduced. Bees are in the getting ready for winter mode and wax production is not needed for winter.
     
  10. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Thank you so much. That explains everything I thought was a problem with my late season swarms. I need to give them some foundation with comb already drawn out.
     
  11. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    To touch on the original post here is what happened to me this year. I had several hives in an area that had marginal honey production. Some years ok but others pretty sparse. I ended up moving the hives last year to a new location. I drove by the original site today that I moved off of. The farmer has planted over 400 acres of commercial sunflowers that would have been right out the hives front door. All in full bloom right now. Missed the boat on that one.
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Riverrat, you may not have missed the boat, i've had several beekeepers tell me Sunflower honey is not that great, and it granulates fast? Jack
     
  13. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I have put bees on sunflowers in the past. The honey has a different taste but people once they try it like it. It does Crystallize fast.