Where to position the support for the hive?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Intheswamp, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    I've seen hives supported along the front and back, along the sides, and sitting almost completely on two cement blocks (not hardly any space beneath). I'm thinking of supporting mine from the sides with a space between using cement blocks...this is what I've pretty much always seen around here (and how I'm supporting the little colony I have at the present). Thinking about it, though, the fact that the weight of the frames are resting on the front and back ends of the box makes me wonder if it would be better to support the box from those ends...or does it really matter?

    Has anybody got any thoughts on how to support the hives?

    Am I over-thinking this too much??? :dontknow:

    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  2. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    I have several up on benches and several on blocks. I find it easier to work & level up the ones on benches but that is just my preference. I have three hives per 8' bench.
     

  3. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    providing the hives are not leaning at too bad a angle, and your not experiencing hurricane for winds on a regular basis, side to side support actually is a pain for inspecting the hive, rest assured the bees will propolize the hive components together in a most convincing manner. With some bees you'd want a jackhammer and a bit of dynamite to open the hive.
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Most bottom boards do not facilitate support in the front, directly under the frames, unless you use an entrance reducer permanently. That would also reduce your intruders and you do not want to hinder small hive beetles exploiting your hive.
    My hive stands are open and exactly the size of the bottom board, which is the super size.
     
  5. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I prefer individual 10 to 12 inch high wooden stands. These are 4 legs and a top frame the same size as the hive base. I want rain and snow to run down the hive and stand and fall to the ground. I don't want a protruding ledge for water to gather to rot the floor. I use varroa floors. I don't want the stand to catch debris and encourage wax moth and others. I can use open varroa floors during the winter. During confining weather, fresh wax crumbs on the ground under the stand tells me that the colony is still alive.

    Of course ----- "Ask two beekeepers about something and ------" :)
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    some hives I keep on stands 12 to 14 inches tall and these work fine unless the hive's get exceptionally tall. for up to 3 layers of boxes that height works well.

    other hives I set on pallets. these seem to resist being topple by wind better... most especially if they get a bit too tall. if you have the possibility of flooding, a minimum height above the ground is an issue worth pondering over.
     
  7. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I use 4 cement blocks 2 at each end then 2-4x4s across, works great for 3 hives and you can look under and see up into the hive through the screened bottom board, so for me Im supporting at the sides not front or back.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    zookeep writes:
    see up into the hive through the screened bottom board

    tecumseh:
    obviously one of the variable I never really consider since I use solid bottom bars. if you do use screened bottom boards access for taking a look or some monitoring activity would be very important.
     
  9. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Today I built my stand for the hive when I get it. I made it out of 2x4x8ft treated enought for 3 hives I hope. I made the legs out of 2x4 treated also 18inches high. I didn't get it level yet but hope to tommorrow, than I will give it a few coats of paint when the lumber kind of dries out, petty dang wet right now. Getting ready.

    Kedee
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    3 hives can weigh 600 lbs. or more. The end of a 2X4 isn't enough of a foot in dirt. Use a patio block or similar to set the legs on.
     
  11. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Level is good. I knew that (from a theoretical aspect) last year when I first got started. Notice I said from a theoretical aspect. The bees taught me the practical aspect of this. Wacky comb made me stand back and thump myself repeatedly on the forehead. DOOOH. :frustrated:

    Be sure to post pics of your stands.
     
  12. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    A new hive stand is on my "to do" list as well. I've got another hive to assemble when I get around to it and I'm wanting to make a stand that will hold both hives and be high enough and in a good place with sun all the time.

    The one hive I have now is also on four cinder blocks and 2x4s, and I think it's a little low for me.
     
  13. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Iddee, thanks a great idea, I have some 8x16 flat concrete blocks I can set under the 2x4, hope I got 6.

    Kebee
     
  14. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I set my hives on cinder blocks along the side. Did have a guy here made some fancy steel stands with legs about a foot tall. No base on the bottom when the hive got heavy and the rain came. He had hives setting on flat ground
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    When I can find them (thrown away) Plastic soda-bottle crates are great. If you get the right size, they can fit just inside the outer rim of the floor. They are strong, give great support, are generally easy to set up level, don't sink in when it rains, are (for me) a good height and they are easy to move when the need arises.
     
  16. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Sorry efmesch. I tried the plastic crates but gave them up. The crates I used had been used to hold 20 x 1 pint glass milk bottles. I found that using an Open Mesh Floor/ Screened Bottom Board, when the slide was out (most of the time with me) the debris fell onto the dividing walls of the crate --- possibly encouraging nasties. It was a so-and-so job to clean out this debris with a hive in position.
     
  17. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I may not be understanding this properly. I am picturing a crate that contacts the floor of the bottom board, but does not contact the rim. Since all the weight of the hive is transferred down through the walls to the rim, I would think this would put excessive shear stress on the floor/rim joint of the bottom board.

    If I misunderstood, ... ignore this!
     
  18. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Hobie, you understood me corrrectly. :thumbsup:
    I've never had problems with the weight on the floor and not the rim. HOWEVER, I wouldn't be surprised if there are crates that fit the frame too, and, should one want, the hive can be turned 90 degrtees. Then it rests on the frame--here's no problem with that either. As to cleaning underneath with screened or open bottoms, That IS a problem.
    What I particularly like about the crates is that they are one light unit (easily movedwhen necessaary) and don't get knocked over. like sometimes happens with bricks. They also provide contact support evenly on all four sides. :|
     
  19. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I hear ya with the light weight benefit! It takes me three trips to move my 4 concrete half-blocks and two 2x6's.
     
  20. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Well today was a nice day after the fog lifted, got up to 72. I finish my stands, level with 3/8 inch drop to the front so rain water will drain out I hope and set the 2x4 on concrete blocks at Iddee sugestion which I though was a good one. I am waiting until next month to paint to let the lumber dry out some more. I will be ordering some more boxes so I can paint it all at the same time. I cut quite a few limbs off of the trees around one side of the back yard that was hitting me in the face as I nowed, haven't got all the limbs to the pile that I am going to have to burn before I get my bees for it is within 50 feet of where I am going to put my hives. Don't want any of them getting burned up.

    Kebee