Where's the brood???

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by crackerbee, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here are some pics of a cutout in a water meter box I did in in St. Pete yesterday.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    As I removed each piece looking for the right comb to cut and looking for brood,I was 3/4 of the way through the nest and still never found any brood.There were plenty of bees in there and maybe only a half pound of honey,but lots of nectar ripening,in fact over 3/4 of the nest was nectar and pollen.Finally I got to the last comb and looked it over and found scattered brood(very very few) and half of the last comb was drone comb with a few capped and few larvae scattered about.The comb was beautiful and the little capped honey was absolutely the best I've ever had.I didn't see any queen cups,cells at all,so I'm a little puzzled why there were no brood,and didn't find a queen.
    I brought them home and they're in a single deep and there are plenty of bees in there.Should I maybe just wait to see if maybe I missed(doubtful I looked real well)some brood they can use for a queen ,or just wait a week or 2 and see what's going on and decide from there?

    Any advice is always welcome.


    Here's is next Tuesdays cutout,it's the same as my first one I did back in May,an open nest in an oak tree,it's a "gimmee" :thumbsup: :lol:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    With no brood and no stores, sounds like you have been as dry as us here and they are already eating their winter stores. I would feed them good and check back in a week or two or signs of brood. If there is not any food in the house, no need to keep laying eggs in quantity.

    That open hive looks like a doooozy to get out, what is the plan of attack??
     

  3. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wasn't bad at all,there was an inset of about an 1 1/2" under the top of the meter box,so we just did the crowd control thing(what you taught me last May)at first with the Bee vac design I built like yours,and then the comb just came out like turning pages in a book.After we did the cut out i puffed a little smoke in the bottom inlet of the bee vac box and threw on a SBB,then sprayed a little syrup on the and gave the box a thump and removed the top of the bee vac and put in the cut out and blank foundation frames and replaced the bee vac box top ratchet strapped it down and took em" home.


    BTW G3 you did catch the avatar change right? :lol: You'll bee hearing from me in a couple a weeks. :lol:


    GO GATORS!!!
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was talking about the one in the tree.

    Crowd control huh :lol: :lol:

    Sounds like you did a good job with the water meter box though.
     
  5. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sorry thought you meant the one in the meter box,the one in the tree I'll do it just like the other one in the tree I did,and just gently cut it loose and put it in a screened vented box,tape it closed,then take it to the hacienda and finish the cut out on the back porch(mama will bee proud of me hahahaha when she gets home. :rolling: :rotfl:
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    the comb look almost new???

    here my first concern is beware of bees in water meter boxes.
     
  7. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes Tec the comb looked fairly new.

    Can you expand a little of the reason why you say beware of bees in meter boxes?
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A european honey bee (in it's natural state) prefers a nest size about the size of a langstroth body and about 15 to 20 feet in the air. in an almost treeless landscape they will quite often take up residence in rock faces or caves. the african honey bee is not nearly so selective and doesn't need nearly the space required of their european cousin. they will set up residence just about anywhere.

    other clear indication of africanized honey bee includes a noticable smaller cell size and the bottom edge of any comb tends to be very straight (the bottom edge of natural comb constructed by european bees tends to have a very noticeable wave in it's construction.

    at one time the best thing here to do was to send a sample off and have it tested... but we are so poor here that the state can no longer afford this service. so the $100,000 building and the 10's of thousands of dollars spent on fairly high tech lab equipment now goes unused because we can not afford anyone properly trained to use these facilities and equipment.
     
  9. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Tec in pic # 2 the comb shown is upside down from the way it was in the nest,is that the wave you're talking about?

    Let's hope they're not AHB,maybe I should requeen the hive as a precaution :dontknow: ?

    Thoughts???
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    it looks extremely straight from what I can see. I would think if you are collecting feral swarms and hives and you have no way of absolutely knowing then requeening with something known is a good idea. it would be better (I think) to have some mechanism to actually discern the european from the african hybrids. For one think once you can recognized the essential traits of a africanized hive you then can kind of know without testing.

    at small population size both the 'bad european' bees (which everyone except those of us who came to know german black bees now seems to have forgotten) and the african cousins are not typically nasty. with larger numbers things do dramatically change.