Which would you do?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Tia, Jul 17, 2011.

  1. Tia

    Tia New Member

    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You'll recall that in May, all 4 of my hives had no brood, no queen and you all were thrilled and confirmed my thoughts that amazingly all 4 had virgin queens. You were absolutely right. However, today upon examination, one of those 4 once again has only capped drone brood. No sign of eggs, queen, worker brood, but the hive is not acting queenless. . .sweet as sugar and calm. The colony is very large and strong. Should I:
    1. Assume there's a virgin queen again, wait 10 days and look for eggs? (Getting late in the season for this nonsense.)
    2. Order a new queen and install her, but watch for rejection?
    3. Put a frame of eggs from another hive in and see if they raise a queen? (Once again, getting late in the season).
    4. Other? Please tell me what.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    #3.....

    Then if they don't have queen cells in 5 days, shake them out. It's not too late to raise a queen. She will lay all of Sept. and Oct. and be ready to go strong in the spring.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I also vote for #3, You will be able to tell in a week if they are going to raise a new queen. If no queen cells then there must have been a virgin running around some where. Not too late in the season yet, a frame of brood and a little syrup will make up for some lost ground.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    not sure what your weather is like there but around here its been hot for an exteded period of time. I have seen queens shut down laying in the heat. Not sure if its your case but Im willing to bet after the last 3 weeks of 100 degree days there isnt much brood in some of my hives. and a few would appear queenless.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would vote for #1 but #3 would be a good fall back position.

    ps... if you have capped drone brood you are a bit early in that particular hive.
     
  6. Tia

    Tia New Member

    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    #3 it is. Thanks all. riverrat, we were cooking for an extended period of time, but we've been luxuriously cool (mid-80's) for about 4 days now. . .one day left and we'll be back in the cooker (mid-90's here on the water) with lots of humidity. Tecumsuh, just a few cells on about 3 frames, but you're right. . .I saw no drone cells in the other hives!
     
  7. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    Iddee what do you mean when you said"Then if they don't have queen cells in 5 days, shake them out"

    Thanx Cracker
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    With a lot of drone cells, no worker cells, the hive is most likely queenless. If not, there should be eggs within a week. No eggs, no queen cells a week from now means workers are putting out queen pheremones even if not laying yet. The best remedy for a laying worker hive is a shakeout 25 feet from the other hives.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    drone require about 26 days or so. once the old queen is gone they will always be the last kind of bee to emerge. a queen requires 16 days plus another 16 to mature and mate. therefore all the drones in a hive should emerge prior to the time a new queen will begin to lay.
     
  10. Tia

    Tia New Member

    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks, tecumseh. That's the way my thought processes were running too.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    On average, I agree, but I have seen queens lay on day 21. She would be laying the same day the last workers emerged. Also seen some not lay until day 30 or more.