While the orange growers used to spray insecticides a few times a year

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Americasbeekeeper, Oct 3, 2013.

  1. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    1,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    While the orange growers used to spray insecticides a few times a year, The Ledger newspaper reports that they are now dousing their groves monthly. Needless to say, the region’s apiarists are none too pleased to see their bees being killed by the insecticides. The conundrum has Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, who is also a citrus grower, desperate to find a solution that can protect both the state’s fruit and honey industries.
    [h=1]Florida citrus growers binge on pesticides, endangering bees[/h]By John Upton
    ShutterstockDon’t breathe in!
    Floridian citrus growers are upping the chemical ante as they struggle to save their groves from citrus greening — a devastating bacterial infection spread by tiny invasive insects known as Asian citrus psyllids.
    While the orange growers used to spray insecticides a few times a year, The Ledger newspaper reports that they are now dousing their groves monthly. (And we recently told you about a Florida’s Natural supplier that was accused of spraying its crops every four days with multiple chemicals, killing off honeybee colonies and leading to a $1,500 fine.)
    Needless to say, the region’s apiarists are none too pleased to see their bees being killed by the insecticides. The Ledger article describes a growing war between Florida’s powerful citrus growers and the smaller apiary industry:
    A major issue for beekeepers comes during the citrus bloom period, which generally comes in March and April but can extend weeks earlier or later depending upon weather conditions.
    Beekeepers involved in honey production traditionally place hives in or near groves so the bees produce citrus-flavored honey, one of the most popular varieties.
    That practice puts bees in the line of fire when growers spray during bloom, an important period for controlling psyllids, who are especially drawn to new growth, Rogers said.
    “The days of putting bees right in the middle of a grove, I think those days are gone,†said Bobbi Bell of Bell Apiaries LLC in Fort Meade, a 32-year veteran of the industry.
    But beekeepers also contract with other growers to release bees in their fields for pollination, which also puts them at risk from pesticides in citrus groves.
    The conundrum has Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, who is also a citrus grower, desperate to find a solution that can protect both the state’s fruit and honey industries.
    http://grist.org/news/florida-citru...=syndication&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    This is the problem. The beekeepers have loved this huge mono-crop of flowering bloom for years reaping the rewards of it's bounty. Now because of spraying for one pest in the middle of the bloom this flowering oases has become toxic to the bees. I feel sorry for the bees as they are the innocent victon cought in the middle of this dispute. but as beekeepers we must realize that with out the controls for this pest, the trees will become diseased and will die and their will be no citrus bloom for the bees. Being in an area with orchards and spray applications I under stand the need of cooperation between beekeeper and orchardest. I would love to keep the hives in the orchard for the full bloom to take advantage of the abundance of pollen and nectar but wheb we get the call that they have enough fruit set and they are going to spray the bees have to be moved.
    By meeting about the problem it brings the discussion out in the open and can leeds to government funding and research into alternative treatments, and spray application guidelines.
    Perry on an other thread talked about it being the beekeeper that ends up making the sacrifices, in most cases this is true. We have to keep in mind that it is impossible to move the orchard away from the bees to protect them.
     

  3. kebee

    kebee Active Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    My brother lives in Florida and from working with the railroad and now retired he dose spraying on orange trees, he has quite a few his self and sprays for others as well as other thing in the droves. I ask him about the spaying he dose and at what time of day, he said he only sprays in the evening time, come to find out he has a friend that have a lot of hives and he been talking to him about it and was told the time of day to spray, just hope he is doing this.

    Ken
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    kind of funny now ain't it! you saturate the environment with all sorts of insecticides, fungicides and herbicides and pretty soon the only thing that can live there is some nasty pathogens and the cock roaches. not so unexpectedly you elevate folks born to the 'right families' with C- degrees to some level of authority and pretty soon thru incompetence and neglect the machinery starts coming apart.

    perhaps things have changed but at least during my time in Florida NO citrus grower gave a whit about whether they did or did not spay someone else's bees. any and all with significant holding really didn't care if they sprayed your house or your children or ran some nasty chemical down into some pristine looking stream.... 'the elect' seeing themselves as better than everyone else (see above link on the illegal spaying of groves in Florida if you doubt this assumption) don't need to comply with any rules or regulation.