White Wax?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Crofter, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    When the bees start building comb and capping with noticeably whiter wax is there a message of significance behind it. What causes the change?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    All new wax is white. It darkens with age. If it is on honey, the honey being capped may be clearer, making the wax look whiter.
     

  3. bee stung

    bee stung New Member

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    also if honey cap white or real light color , is dry capping (cap not touching the honey ) dark cap on honey is wet cap ( honey touching cap ) if selling comb honey, a few don't like wet cap honey and will pay a little more for dry cap comb ..
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    often seen at the top of the frames some folks call this 'frosting'.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I like to compare it to the "welcome mat" that gets darker the more we walk on it. Remember, the bees come in from the field with dust they've collected on their feet. The more they walk on the wax surface, the more gets wiped off their feet.
    Wax from dark honey picks up a LITTLE bit of the honey's coloring. Wax from the brood chamber gets dark from the cast exuviae of the developing brood that get pushed against the inner surfaces of the cells.
    The color of extracted wax is dependent on how well all these impurities are removed when the wax is melted down.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Just wait till your bees get on a good goldenrod flow. The wax gets stained a beautiful yellow/golden colour.
     
  7. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Hope I don't take us too far off subject, but since we are talking about white wax vs. stained wax...

    I recently heard of someone who put green food coloring in their sugar syrup so that they could tell if the bees were backfilling the syrup into the honey. Has anyone heard of this? Seems to me that it would stain the wax and the wax would be green forevermore. At that point, one wouldn't know WHAT they had in the comb!
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Didn't you hear the results of the experiment? Or did the experimenter only report on his question? Of course there's one sure way to get the answer--try it out yourself---and don't forget to report the results to the forum.
     
  9. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I heard it third-hand. A newbee beek that I work with was talking to another beek that was doing it. Apparently, it was working to suit his needs. It just sounded odd to me. I may try it unless someone knows of a negative impact. Thoughts?