Whta kind of behavior is this?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ablanton, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    First of all, my apologies for the poor quality of the video. I was using my phone to take the video, it was getting dark, and the cat kept pushing my hand...

    What kind of behavior is this? There were several bees doing this. There were also several bees in small clumps of 2 to 4 that seemed to be "wrestling".

    Five minutes after taking this video, everyone went inside except for about half a dozen just hanging out in the doorway.

    [video=youtube;PUFXsVAO7RA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUFXsVAO7RA&feature=plcp[/video]
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Looked a little Rated R there for a moment, ha! But, it almost looks like their being juveniles at play...beats me...
     

  3. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    actually sounds like a robbing session that was thwarted by guard bees, can't see the movies from this computer. Were they attempting to sting the other bees or carry them off the landing board? Is the nectar flow over. If so then could be attempted robbers.
    Barry
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    the one bee is raising her abdomen and fanning an alarm scent to inform the hive that there is a possible intruder trying to get into the hive. <there is a name for this but currently I am having an old timer's moment.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    looks like bees from another hive attempting to enter the nuc
     
  6. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Good thing you had an entrance reducer on. Makes it easier for the colony to defend themselves from robbers.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    to tec's post:
    "the one bee is raising her abdomen and fanning an alarm scent to inform the hive that there is a possible intruder trying to get into the hive."

    bee culture>a closer look-sting alarm pheremone

    a short quote from the article:
    " When patrolling guard bees perceive an intruder they raise their abdomens in the air, extruding the sting. Alarm pheromone is released and fanned into the hive by the agitation of wings, and workers come rushing out to pursue the intruder. However, the intruder must be in motion in order for bees to locate and attack it. The immediate but rather short-lived defensive response that alarm pheromone produces classifies it as a 'releaser' pheromone"."
     
  8. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Thanks for the info, everybody. Robbed by my own bees! This hive was in my front yard. The robbers had to be from the one in my backyard. I never saw a single honey bee until I started keeping a few months ago.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The video definitely looked like an attempted and thwarted robbery, time to feed some bees. The wrestling certainly sounds like the same.

    Is the name of the gland "nasarov" and the action "nasaroving"? (actually I thought that was - marking home, the queen is here.)

    But I'm not sure.