Why a queen-right finisher?

Discussion in 'Raising Queens' started by d.magnitude, Jun 15, 2012.

  1. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    The literature seems to suggest that one has the highest rate of success using a queen-less starter, and a queen-right finisher for making cells.

    I understand why you would have a better take introducing grafts into a queen-less starter (seems obvious). I'm not exactly sure why they are finished better in a queen-right unit. What I've read kind of says "it's just so".

    I'm not arguing that a queen-right finisher isn't better, just wondering why? Is it just a morale thing? Are the nurse bees more stimulated by the continual hatching of larvae? Has anybody out there read, or know the answer?

    Thanks, Dan
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    It takes a lot of resources to raise good queens - carbohydrates (honey), protein (pollen), and nurse bees. A queen-right hive supplies the most of all three without constant manipulation. As you might have read going into the hive while raising or changing queens or after they are first hived increases rejection. The best answer without explanaton is the higher failure rate by adding nurse bees, brood frames and food every day. You cannot do some newspaper combine for queen production.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think there are several facets working here and some of the more important ones have been well covered by Americasbeekeeper above.

    the remaining factors are somewhat strategic in nature..... for the big boys you move cells to a finisher and try to get another round of cells from the same starter. since the finisher is queen right you have a reduced probability of catching a wayward virgin. some times there is physical separation between the starters and finishers... so you can have starter hives close to a grafting facility and the finishers out nearer where the cells will be use <basically at the white pupae stage the queens in their little cells are quite fragile to any bouncing or movement so you have not moved them at that stage.