Why is honey measured in Pounds and not Gallons

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by bamabww, Oct 1, 2012.

  1. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Or quarts or pints like other liquids are done? We were turning in our honey totals to our local bee club and since this was my first year to turn in an amount, I didn't know any better than to list my total as 11 gallons. Our bookkeeper said "then you had approximately 110 pounds."

    I asked why was it not done in liquid measure and she didn't know except "that's what we've always done."
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    That is sad. Honey is measured by volume or weight. Some states that require labeling, require weight and volume.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    guessing here for sure bama... a given volume of honey weight may vary somewhat depending on where you are located and the kind of honey plant your bees collected the honey from.

    for example honey collected (years ago) in the Dakotas where the primary nectar sources were sweet clover and alfalfa and the air was quite dry would tip the scales at about 12#/gallon and here in Central Texas where most of the nectar sources are wild flowers and where we do experience fairly high humidity levels honey typically is about 11.5#/gallon.
     
  4. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    The weight of honey will vary depending on moisture content. Because of the drought this year, my honey is exceptionally thick (low moisture content), so when I fill 1 lb jars, my customers are getting more than 1 lb of honey.
     
  5. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I gallon of water weighs about 8 lbs, while 1 gallon of honey will weigh as much as 12 lbs. But as the amount of water that is still in the honey goes up the weight per gallon goes down.

    For today it seems weird that we even care about the weight it should be all about the volume. I mean 1 lb jar spreads on the same amount of toast regardless of what it weighs.

    I can't confirm it but I suspect that honey ever got started being traded by weight because it was at one time one of those things that could be used as a currency. It did not spoil etc so you could travel with it. and at times in history it had a very high value. Some other things that have served as currencies woudl be. Sugar, Tobacco.

    Most currency are traded by weight. Gold silver even gems are traded by the carat. I suppose if you had hauled a few lbs of honey around on the back of a donkey you would be far more interested in how much it weighs also. You can only load so many lbs on your mule so those lbs have to count for as much value as possible.
     
  6. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

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    I believe, I read it has to do with selling comb Honey
    So if you had a 4oz. of cut comb versus 4inch block
    same goes for a pint with, or with out a piece of
    Cut Comb in it
     
  7. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    Tommyt, I guess that makes since. they didn't always have mason jars.
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Honey has been bought sold and traded for longer than standard glass jars have been made, also before the langstroth hive and honey was extracted. The good white combs were sold as honey comb. the liquid honey was stored in clay pots, non of which would have been a standard size.
     
  9. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Is milk not a food?
     
  11. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

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    It's baby cow food for sure
    :grin:
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I sell quarts (glass mason jars) they are supposed to hold 3lbs. of honey to a quart, and has to have the weight on the label (48oz.). My great grandfather (i was told) sold honey out of the back of his buckboard in Ava, Mo. in sliced off chunks of comb honey, and wrap in paper, or the containers the customer brought with them. I guess they didn't have a health dept. back then.:grin: Jack
     
  13. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    It's my theory that because honey is heavy you can get more out of it selling it by weight. I don't know that, but it's my story & I'm sticking to it.
     
  14. Minz

    Minz Member

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    Never thought of selling cut comb, suddenly it makes a small bit of sense.
    So a full pt canning jar at 1.5 lbs would be a reasonable number?