Will my hive platform collapse?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Max, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Max

    Max New Member

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    I've read in books, magazines, and on other websites many different answers to the question "how much does a hive weigh?" I realize at least some of the reasons for the wildly varying weights, and I'm not looking for a definitive, unqualified answer, just one appropriate to my situation. I'm building a platform on wheels to simplify moving the hives to fresh feeding grounds and inside a shelter for the winter. If possible, I'd like to avoid getting all the hives on this platform only to find the structure collapse as the season progresses. What I'm asking is anyone able to spare a couple minutes share with me the approximate maximum weight your hives would reach, under normal circumstances, if comprised of 2 brood boxes, 2 honey supers, a top feeder, and a stand. (All sections contain 10 frames, the brood box frames are 9", and the honey super frames are 6 ½"). If a fair number of people from this forum share their empirical results, I'd trust the average of y'alls results over any single, black and white answer I've found so far.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    you are describing 2 deep and 2 mediums with top and bottoms + some kind of top feeder. some significant variation could occur if the deeps were plugged out with honey vs the mediums but what follows would be my best guess if the hive was set up in some normal fashion (ie deeps below and supers on top).

    Tops and bottom 10# plus the weight of feeder (guessing wildly here) add another 10#. two deeps from side to side with brood and just a bit of feed add 60# per box. two mediums heavy with honey add another 50# per box. should be something like a gross total of 250 pounds.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    That was my guess as tot he weight when I was first reading this.

    Not sure how far you are going to move a hive to greener pastures, but that would wear me out pushing several hives 6, 8, 10 miles and then back again. Better put some wide wheels on this rig so it doesn't sink into the ground unless you are on a hard surface (black top or concrete). Might need some brakes on the contraption if going down hill and a motor for going up hill. Better yet why not just put them on a trailer so you could tow them around with your truck.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Agree with tec, but to make it simple for permanent use, I would figure 75 lb. per deep and 50 lb. per medium super. Easy calculation at any given point.
     
  5. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Agree with above posts,

    I was thinking about moving my hives near these huge alfalfa fields I found yesterday. I came home, Google Earth'd it, and in a straight line, it was 9/10ths of a mile from where the hives sit now to the fields. It was 3 miles on the truck odometer lol. Needless to say...no wheels needed...;)
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I would rethink moving them inside a shelter in the winter. While this was common years ago there is really no benifit to doing this today. On the cart what is your plan for moving them. Is the cart to be used to load on a trailer and moved with a vehicle. They make a cart that can be used from one hive to another when moving.
     
  7. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    In average

    A shallow super will typically yield between 25 and 30 pounds of honey, or 2 to 2 ½ gallons.

    A medium (6 5/8â€) depth super will typically yield between 35 and 40 pounds, or 3 to 4 gallons.

    A full-depth box will typically yield between 60 and 70 pounds, or 5 to 6 gallons.

    To stay safe I would calculate as all boxes are full of honey.
    tec's math is about right.