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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife has bought 250 bee boxes with frames; about a third of them have drawn comb and some honey. They will be stored in a tent like structure on top of pallets. So they will be dry but subject to the cold of a Manitoba winter. The average low in December, January, February is below -20 degrees Celsius (-10 degrees Fahrenheit).
We will probably try to get a few of them started in the spring.
What I am wondering is that if there are any hidden diseases in the boxes will the cold kill them off.
 

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Cold will not kill American Foulbrood or Nosema spores, neither will sunlight or bleach. Keep the mice out, when it warms up either cross stack them with plenty of fresh air and sunshine or treat otherwise for wax moths.
 

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Americanbeekeeper writes:
Cold will not kill American Foulbrood or Nosema spores

tecumseh:
nosema apis spores will likely not be altered by cold. nosema carena does not thrive so well in cold climates.

is the comb + honey secure from bears, mice, etch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for answering my question.

I am actually in Australia at the moment. I'll be here for a few months before I return to Canada. So my wife is taking care of my place.

The boxes are all from a seller who says they are disease free, but I think I will treat with acetic acid to be sure. If I find signs of foulbrood I will have to just accept that they are a loss and burn them.

Mice could get in, if there are any signs of rodents I'll have to get rid of them. I don't think we have a bear problem where I am; I haven't seen one yet, but maybe free honey will bring them out of the woods.
 

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as far as I can tell and from what I have read nothing beside irradiating bee furniture (I assume much like they currently do with strawberries) provide much insurance from any of the disease nasties associated with bee keeping. it is my understanding irradation kills all.

use equipment is pretty much pay your money and take your chances <the reputation of the seller counts for much here. i myself try to forewarn new bee keepers not to dwell so much on the various diseases and pathogens associated with bee keeping since these are typically at low probabilities. with small number a bee keeper could go for decades and never witness one case of any of these disease. at the get go it is a good thing to know when bees are doing well and when they are not... from this the 'are not' can have a multitude of reason for fairing poorly and not all of these are disease related (but may well casually appear to be some disease). for most new bee keepers you will learn by 'the exception to the rule' and hopefully very slowly.
 

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250 boxes, my guess is they are clean. I would use them as is, and take my chances. You are about as likely to get foul brood from traveling drones as you are from those boxes.

In this case, I think the rewards far outweigh the risks.
 

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Generally speaking, when AFB shows up in a apairy, others will soon find out and spread the word out of self preservation. nosema is always there, never a real issue until another event ( stress ), triggers a lowering of the bee's immunological responses. If that occurs, many nasty things can happen, and is a major consideration when migrating colonies all over the country--as you can well imagine is a serious stress factor. With all that was said I would use the equipment without much worries, keep the colonies stress at a minium, get them strong, keep them that way--you will do well. :thumbsup:
Barry
 
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