Winter double hive stack divider.

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by Gypsi, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm guessing a 1x2 frame with screen on top and screen on bottom to go between the hive on the bottom and the hive on the top? Tried a search but don't even know what this is called.

    The idea being to keep a couple of small hives warm.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Look up "Snelgrove". It can be used for what you are describing.
     

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  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Any idea where I could order one of these? I do not have the tools to rip 1-by (or any wood) into thin pieces, I'd like to keep all fingers attached, best way to do that is NOT to try to rip one-by.

    Gypsi
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    try searching for a 'double screen'.... these do not have to be fancy or especially well constructed. there should be some small space between the two screens. if you do not have a shop the wider dimension material should work just fine.... that is the dimension of the frames really doesn't matter much..... I would go to Lowe's or Home Depot and look in the lumber racks for some 3/4 inch by 1 and 1/2 inch stuff and construct the double screen frame from that. Also the screen doesn't really have to be special either. any kind of METAL screen should work just fine.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    What tecumseh said, you could just buy some 3/8" lath. Make 3 squares and sandwich 2 pieces of hardware cloth between them. You might want a strip or 2 across the middle to prevent the cloth from sagging towards each other. Then just cut a small entrance(s) for the top boxes(s).
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    who sells 3/8" lath? Googling...
     
  7. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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  8. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Put in wrong data
     
  9. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    BetterBee and Brushy Mountain both sell them.
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Sorry, most lath is 3/8" thick and maybe an inch or so across. the thickness is good and the width is not really all that important.
     
  11. klpauba

    klpauba New Member

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    I bought a few bundles of lath at Lowes (it was in the area where they sell bags of cement). It's darned expensive, though. A bundle of maybe 50 three foot pieces set me back $15!
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    You can always use the extras when wrapping your hives with tarpaper. :wink: (assuming of course you wrap your hives). :oops:
     
  13. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    With these screens, won't the mites in the top hive fall onto the bees in the bottom hive or is that not really a concern when over-wintering? It just seems like the mite load for the bottom hive could increase this way idk.
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm thinking #8 screen, on top, window screen below. Whatever falls through the top is hanging in midair on top of the windowscreen. But I am not awake enough to be thinking. Will ponder this in the morning.
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That's not bad. I rarely hit Lowes for lumber, but since it would cost me $15 for ONE dual screen, and since I need thin wood for proper robber guards, that's a bargain to me. It's all a matter of perspective.
    For the guy with the great table saw who can cut his own, that would be high... Since I lack that saw, I will check lowes.
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I myself would not be so worried about varroa since at this time of year their numbers should be low. the real difference in the screen is that with hardware wire the opening are wide enough that the bees will not close off the screen with propolis. the window screen on the other hand will fairly quickly be totally closed off (which may not be a bad thing).

    there are any number of places you might wish to look in a lumber store for the thin wood pieces. the marker stick used for flagging an area are generally located around where the concrete is located and of course their is generally several kinds of small dimension wood in the area set aside for finish or trim lumber. of course if you did happen to drive by a cabinet shop there is a good possibility that there would be thin wood strips in the dumpster <and I myself always prefer a dive into a dumpster over a stroll thru Home Depot or Lowes.
     
  17. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    I'm thrilled to see this thread. I've got two hives I want to double stack and need to do it in the next week or so, and I've got a line on a local woodworker. So I'm going to just send him this thread link!
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Tec you are an inspiration, dumpsters are pretty cool and there is a lumber company that does custom cabinets maybe a mile from me..

    The time factor is fluctuating on me. On the one hand I will need to stack hives, on the other hand it is critical that I NOT tick the bees off before Son-in-law comes to tackle chevy trucks. Need to call him before I plan on opening any hives. If he comes, 2 grandchildren do too, and my ladies are much sweeter if undisturbed.

    Thank you.
     
  19. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    For folks living in cold winter areas- if you are moving boxes or hives around as it gets cold now, make sure you are not creating open cracks between the boxes by breaking all the bees propolis seals. If you do, you might consider tarpaper or even layers of duct tape to help block the wind through the cracks before the real cold sets in.
     
  20. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I like the shiny silver duct tape - the expensive kind. It stays put!