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Just building a new hive... 8 frame, charred interior, insulated, and decorated exterior... just to play with and experiment with.
 

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Well I am new to beekeeping...I don't even have bees yet. :cry:
Likely I'll be getting my bees in the Spring...I am planning two hives in my back yard.
My autumn/winter activity plans are consisting of reading and talking and observing (I've also been visiting other recreational beekeepers and seeing their setups)....then also I'll soon be ordering my two hives and equipment (I'd like to get them painted this Fall- much better painting weather here).

Yesterday we laid down a whole area of mulch and stone in back of my garden, so we'd have a nice out-of-the-way spot ready for the hives, where my husband would not have to mow at all within 8-10 feet of the hives all around. It's a good spot I think, with the hives facing sun from mid-morning to dusk, yet it's pretty hidden from any neighbors' sight, is protected from winter winds, and has a good flight path with no human traffic. It's the best I can do on our little 1/3 acre lot. Took us DAYS to determine the best place, trying to balance all the placement factors. :(
 

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Build more shallow frames, Build more shallow honey supers, build more screen bottom boards, more inter covers and outer covers maybe even a few deeps.

Take walks with the dogs,


stop and take pictures of pretty snow covered hives.

Set in the living room and watch the deer as they get ready to bed down for the day.



Or while they are already bedded down and chewing their cuds.



Then there are shells to reload.



And the muzzle loader to shoot. Just a few things to do.





:D Al
 

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Did I mention going out to a deer blind so I could read a book in peace?









And shooting deer with the camera.



:mrgreen: Al
 

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Al,
How do you shoot deer from the second blind? Yank open the door and surprise them w/ their pants down? :)

nice pix.

Mark

Oh yeah, I'm gonna pack honey and get it to the stores. Go down to SC to feed the bees, once I get them all down there. Then come March, go south to work on making increase.
 

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winter?..... what's that?

as my momma told me....'even a duck is smart enough to fly south in the winter'.

I have about 150 new 'store bought' deep boxes to dip, nail together and build frames for (not purchased yet, but soon) so I should be fairly busy this winter.
 

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I'm going to try making creamed honey. Never done it before, but I can't waste my investment in a candy thermometer... that I got at a thrift store for 69 cents!
 

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The single deer at the bottom of the post picture was taken from the second picture blind. If you look close you can see the outline of the window which isn't open in the picture.

:D Al
 

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Well here's a pic of one of the boxes on my winter project list... it's almost finished, but not quite.

 

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BjornBee, it's a hive-body... 8-frame medium, insulated, charred interior, decorated exterior (the handles haven't yet been installed). It's a little ridiculous I know... I just wanted to play around with an insulated medium hive just to see if the bees begin building up earlier and stronger in the spring, etc. So I thought... why not go all-out? So that's what I did.
 

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I had a old beekeeper when I first started give me this advice. Never be afraid to expermint. Bees would still bee in a straw skep if people hadn't experminted with wood boxes frames and such.

We have A paradise no matter the season. :oops: Well there is MUD season between winter and spring, :oops: yes mud season between fall and winter too.

:mrgreen: Al
 

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My dumb question is why the chard interior???

:mrgreen: Al
 

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Well, I figured that bees are used to living in trees that have been hollowed out by lightning strikes, and therefore would be charred themselves. Then I thought about how I've never seen mold or any type of fungus growing on natural charcoal, no matter how damp it stays, so I thought Maybe, just maybe, it's useful to the bees as a deterrant against fungal diseases. It's probably ridiculous, but it was a thought, and I thought I'd try it out.

Hobie pretty much nailed it... bored beekeeper, and even though it's not winter yet, all the rain has kept me cooped up inside for far too long.
 
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