Wniter configuration? I want to get this right.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have been thinking I wanted to go into winter with all my hives at 2 deeps and a medium of honey sitting on top.

    That's where I am at right now but wondering if two deeps is enough. The goldenrod is just starting to bloom, I can smell it in the hives. Should I just remove all supers and force them to fill the deeps with goldenrod? We have pretty mild winters here. I think the queens lay into Nov here and pick back up in Feb. Avg temps mid 30 to mid 40's.
     
  2. cheezer32

    cheezer32 New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Personally I think 2 deeps is plenty, I would want the top deep filled and capped, the bottom deep heavy with pollen, a little brood, and honey around the edge if the frames, they usually completely fill the outside frames with honey though. That is a rather ideal set up in my mind and I try to shoot for as close to that as possible.
     

  3. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I agree with Cheezer on this one. We have way longer winters up here and two deeps is still enough. Just keep an eye on them in February. The colony does not use a lot of stores in the winter, but they burn through them pretty quick for brood rearing just prior to the first spring flows.
     
  4. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So, at this point Sept 1st and Goldenrod is just starting to bloom.

    We should just pull all supers, harvest the honey and force them to fill the brood boxes with fall nectar. Monitor and if some seem a little light towards the end of fall, we could feed if needed to in order to finish the fill.

    We will harvest the capped honey to eat or sale and spin out the uncapped stuff and feed it back to them to put back in the deeps.

    This sounds like a good plan.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    2 deeps are plenty in Arkansas. We winter 2 Deeps in Kansas. Just make sure the 2 deeps weight about 100lbs or more and you should be fine. If light you can remove super and feed or leave the super on. They will soon start pulling honey down into the deeps from the super for winter stores.
     
  6. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This time of year they don't always cap everything. Do the shake test on frames that are partially capped, if none of it comes out it's quite likely good to go as well.
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I shook some of mine pretty hard today and nothing came out. But, tested the open cells on the refractometer with a result of 20 percent. So, I put them back on. Good if they eat it all, great if they finish capping it off for me.
     
  8. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

    Messages:
    281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think that is a good plan, except how do you feed back uncapped honey that is spun out? I'm asking because I really don't know. I would place the uncapped honey above an inner cover and have them move it down. I only have one winter of experience, but it was a brutally cold winter here in Utah last year. I gave my one hive 2 deeps and a super. The 2 deeps were way more than enough. Of course, the extreme cold (less bee activity) may be the very reason why it was "more than enough". I also had to deal with left over sugar syrup and new brood in a honey super. Not fun.
     
  9. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have never feed honey but 2 to 1 syrup. I was assuming I could do honey the same way. I use jars with holes poked in the lids and turn
    the upside down. I have top covers I use to set the jars on. They pull it through the holes.