Wood for hives?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Boykins, May 8, 2012.

  1. Boykins

    Boykins New Member

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    I know that lots of hives are made of white pine, but can they be built out of yellow pine. The reason I ask, I have about a dozen logs I'm taking to the mill and if I can use them for hives I will have some of them cut differently. Thanks for any and all advise.
     
  2. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    I'm not sure what to tell you, but it seems I recall reading *somewhere* that the biggest difference between the two is that yellow pine is heavier. It's been noted to cup a bit more than white which might be caused from a higher moisture content..??? It is reported to be somewhat stronger than white pine but also that it splits a bit easier. It has it's pros and cons, it appears.

    Best wishes,
    Ed
     

  3. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    I say give it a shot and let us know how they are doing in a couple of years. I bet they will do just fine.
     
  4. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I got some yellow pine for free. 2x4 and 2x12; beautiful looking wood but you would swear it was no relation to white pine. nearly twice as heavy and certainly more prone to splitting. It moves much more with change in moisture. I would suggest talking to someone who has actuallly used it for similar purposes before you invest a lot in having it sawn. It is terrific as timber but for panelling I would say it has some warts.
     
  5. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I think it would make great boxes once it is planed and dried properly. It is a very dense and HARD wood and should last a long long time. Totally unlike the white boards you buy at the big box stores. But the older it gets the harder it gets. I've burned out drill bits on it before, and nailing was impossible. But that was on a house with framing built in 1914.
     
  6. Boykins

    Boykins New Member

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    I believe I am going to have one log sawed into 1X and give it a try. The worst can happen is I will have to trade out boxes in a few years. It sure will be cheaper than buying white pine at the lumber yard.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yellow pine works, planed and DRIED PROPERLY is the key. you will be waiting awhile for the drying process, and you will most likely wind up with some that will cup and warp anyway. depending on the log, the mill can also give you advice on this.