worms? moth larvae?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by dejswa, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. dejswa

    dejswa New Member

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    I am fairly new to beekeeping. The hive is a about half a year old and consists of 8 frame medium brood nucs x 3 with the third one just recently added. I only recently realized that I should have been feeding them and introduced a dual sided top feeder with the floating boards on each side.

    This is about the fourth filling of the feeder with 1:1 sugar water in a month. It holds 2 gallons. Last week I noticed some hive beetles hiding under the floating boards as the feeder had become dry. I realized that I probably should have kept it full since an empty feeder only adds a hiding place for intruders when it is dry. That is, the bees cannot effectively get under the slats in the boards. Unfortunately I let it run dry again. Need to fill about every 4 or 5 days, I guess. This time when I poured syrup into the feeder, these 'worms' floated out.

    I removed as many as I could although some were almost microscopic. I certainly left some. I cooked the float boards in the oven for about 10 minutes as they were were really thick with the worms. I refilled the feeder. I did not check the nuc below the feeder as I had spent so much time with the top open already. Now I'm thinking I should have just removed the feeder and sterilized it entirely.

    I think maybe these are moth larvae. I am worried about the nuc below the feeder because it is new and sparsely populated and I read that moths like unprotected areas. The rest of the hive is pretty healthy however.

    Any ideas on what I should do next?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If the nuc below it was just foundation then there is not much to worry about, If brood, pollen or honey is/has been in the drawn comb then you definitely need to look.

    Take a close look (with magnifying glass) at the worms, if there are legs only on the head end it will be beetles. Wax moth larva will have legs in the front and some near the tail end.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Forgot to mention that freezing the infested comb, frames, boxes, etc. for 24 hours will kill all of the little buggers.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They look like SHB larva to me. Moth larva wouldn't be in the feeder. When the feeder is empty again, take it off, check below, and close hive. Clean the feeder well and put it back on the following day.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    shb for certain. frame feeder collect them when you feed prior to freezing weather. they may or may not be associated with the hive's frames which is where the real danger lies.

    beyond the sage advice of Iddee above I would monitor the frames towards the outside of the box for any shb disturbance. the first thing you are likely to notice is small webby tunnels running through the comb. DO NOT dump the little larvae on the ground since this is a bit like tossing gasoline on fire.

    are you in Dallas proper or out in one of the suburbs?
     
  6. dejswa

    dejswa New Member

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    Thanks for the replies!

    I forgot to mention the size of the worms (which you cannot really tell from the photos). They varied from almost microscopic to the ones shown in the photos, which are a good 5/8 of an inch long. This would seem a bit big for hive beetles. As noted, I did see some hive beetles living under the float boards last week which was my first clue NOT to let it run dry - just provides a hiding place for pests. Thus, maybe they were larvae of the hive beetles from last week. I have seen plenty of hive beetles (a few, but not many in this hive) and I can't say that I have seen any worms like this. I have some hive beetle traps that you put oil in and place between tops of foundation boards. I'll set them up ASAP.

    BTW, the nuc below was just added two weeks ago and has empty foundation boards - hopefully not empty by now.

    And yes, I am in North Dallas. Overall, this hive has done better than a couple I have in east Texas. Of course, I am mostly in Dallas, so I can look at it every day and that helps.
     
  7. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    it's wax moth larvae. you have to change beehive.
    every frame you move you must examine very good for worms.
    especially if the frame contains pollen. look the bees. you may find a butterfly running on the frame. kill it.
    take the old beehive and clean it very well.take care every hidden spot of it. put 4-5 drops of lavender oil on the bottom of the empty beehive.
    don't afraid to throw the worms on ground. take care to throw them 2-3 metres of the colony. the sun will dry them and the ants do the rest.
    has anyone try to fish with these warms?? try it!!! :yahoo: :yahoo:
     
  8. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    forgive my mistakes :beg:
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    samo... what is the lavander oil suppose to do?

    ps as samo states (somewhat contrary to my prior statement, but I think you get the gest) an active fireant mound is a wonderful place to toss the larvae. you do not want to toss them anywhere there is a lot of organic matter on the ground since you are then assisting in the rearing of the next generation of shb.

    you might wish to take a look (it should be here somewhere in one of the old treads) fat beeman's shb trap. if you don't see large number of shb adults I would worry so much about trapping. I might consider changing the kind of feeder till cold weather arrived at which time the shb will no longer represent a problem. I myself have become fond of freezer baggie as a feeding mechanism in such situations.
     
  10. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    Lavander oil is repulsing the moths in our closets. cedar oil does the same. they are natural products and don't bother the bees. don't use it in honey period. you can use tobacco leaves, tomatoe leaves and walnuts tree leaves on the frames. they repulsing the wax moths also.
    for all the others i agree 100% with you.
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    samo........when using the leaves from plants do you crush them before using or just lay them on the top of the frames?
     
  12. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    i use them as they are lay them on the top of the frames. so, i can remove them easily. this method is not a medicine but helps to keep moth butterflies outside the beehive. it's a natural way. i used and <vapona> once with very good results.vapona can find it in supermarkets.
     
  13. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    forget to tell you, i use the lives with their branches. sorry.
     
  14. KillerSmile

    KillerSmile New Member

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    that was interesting discussion.

    very informative topic dude.

    thanks for that.