Yesterdays cut-out

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by PerryBee, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Well, here's the rest of the story:

    Had the staging set up the night before so my friend Paul (carpenter that did some work on our house and became a friend :thumbsup:) and I started around 11 am cause it was cloudy up until then.
    It is good to have a carpenter friend cause they understand construction better than me, particularily on 200 year old homes. It only took about five minutes (with absolutely no cutting) to remove the metal drip edge, pull nails on the facia board and the bees were exposed. It will be easy to replace it with no visible signs it had even been removed. I on the other hand could have made a mess.

    [​IMG]

    Well, with the facia board off it was pretty easy to see what needed to be done. Actually pretty straight forward. The comb was all new white stuff so the first question had been answered, this was a recent swarm that had set up shop.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I fired up the new shop vac which was connected to my new bee-vac and away I went! It was working extremely well, once I got the suction pressure figured out. I had removed just over half the comb and sucked up what I thought was half the bees when we suddenly noticed that the shop vac was slowing down!
    It wasn't plugged or anything, it sounded like there was a reduction in power to it. I stopped vacuuming bees for a minute, trying to figure out what was going on and then the smoke started billowing out of it! :shock:. We shut it off, disconnected all the hoses and tried it with no restrictions but the smoke continued and then it just ground to a halt!
    NOW WHAT?
    I sat there for a second, figured I guess I gotta keep going on, so I cut off the next piece of comb (with bees attached), checked it over and to my great relief, there was the queen! :thumbsup: I quickly grabbed her (something I rarely do with my ham fists and fingers) and popped her into the JZBZ queen cage I had brought with a marshmallow stuffed in the end. I didn't bother putting any attendants in because I was going to simply put it in the new box to hold the bees there and they would be able to care for her until she was released.

    [​IMG]

    I cut off the remaing comb and swept bees as best I could onto the beevac entrance.
    Once the comb was all removed I figured that I would remove the top of the vac and just add a second deep. I carefully placed the queen cage between a couple frames of comb and closed up the hive, leaving only the new bottom board I had set up open.
    A lot of bees flying around but considering I had no way of collecting them now (and no real need to now that I knew I had the queen) I cleaned up and left them to find their own way to the new hive.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I checked over the comb we had removed and found that there was about 7 comb, most of it filled with nectar, some with the tell tale band of pollen, and upon really close examination i found freshly laid eggs (hard to see on that white comb). Sorry I didn't get more and better pictures but considering the circumstances I just wanted to finish up as soon as I could.
    I was feeling pretty good about it despite the setback but such is life.
    I took my wife and son along around 8 pm to show them what I had done. Paul was going to arrive around 9 pm to help close things up.
    When I got there however, there was a basketball size cluster of bees back in the roof part! :eek:
    What's up with this? I could not figure out where all these bees came from. I checked inside the hive and there were bees there (probably the ones I vacc'd up) and the queen was fine (still in her cage). I could only assume that for whatever reason these bees had not been lured to the new hive. Were they returning foragers or just a lot of bees that I had failed to collect with the vac?
    Anyway, I just squirted them all down with 1 to 1 and scooped up big handfuls and gently set them on the top bars of the second deep, right on top of the queen cage. I did that until I had the biggest part of them in the hive and then closed it up (except for the bottom entrance).
    Paul had arrived and we decided to just leave the roof open for another day till all the bees had found the hive.
    I will find out how well it worked today when I check.
    Besides all the drama, the only thing that puzzled me was even after I caught the queen and installed her with the bees I had sucked up, I never did see the big "fanning" show that is normally displayed by bees when they try to direct the others to their new home. I wonder why?

    Epilogue: Was at the hardware store within half an hour after the intial cut-out with my stinking new shop vac and they replaced it, no questions asked.

     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    New swarm means a possible multiple queens. Maybe one in soffit and one in cage. That would account for the ball and the lack of fanning. The only thing i see out of the ordinary is the wall extends above the 2X4, to the sheathing. I would have thought they would have had much more space than what they had.

    Good job. Congrats.

    PS. I think I would turn the new vac on and let it run for 3 or 4 hours to see if it lasts.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hey Iddee:
    You could possibly be right, the wall does extend beyond that 2 x 4 blocking, but it is a small cavity and I don't think it goes beyond. The vac had quit by then and I couldn't shove the hose in there to try and get them out. I hope you are wrong about the multiple queens cause that will present a whole other issue. If I spend any more time on this I won't make a cent, and I'm not going to be able (allowed) to open this up much further. I guess the next visit will tell the tale.
    P.S. In a way you answered another question, how long should a shop vac run? This one was on less than half an hour and it gave up. Are you running yours for lots longer?
     
  4. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Nice clean job Perry.Looks good.Thx for the pics.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I ran mine 3 1/2 hours Saturday in the barn, using a generator. That isn't unusual. I leave it running after I am finished, until I am ready to pack up and leave, to give them ventilation. When working in the factory during the '70's, we had vac units using the same type motors running 8 hours daily, 40 hours per week.
     
  6. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Good Job Perry! Thanks for the pics. I would still take that vac right back to the store and return it for a completely other brand...

    I wonder if the lack of fanning was due in part to transferring their home, smell, queen and comb to another cavity with no real change for them.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Good advice Iddee.
    Dave, I didn't bother banding any comb into frames, it was almost all filled with necter and a bit of pollen, too heavy to stand up in frames without sagging. I found a small section with eggs, but only a few dozen or so, not worth banding up. The box I put them in is full of comb from a deadout. First sign of trouble with this vac and it goes back and I want my $$ back.
    I will give them the benefit of doubt for now, lemons sometimes happen. :mrgreen:
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Iddee, I followed your link and discovered that you keep busy on more than just one forum. Where do you find the time?
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Perry,
    1. Nice work. You handled the unexpected beautifully.
    2. I assume you said and really meant nectar, and not honey. How did you handle that?
     
  11. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    Nice job and great pics,Thanks Perry...:thumbsup:...:coolphotos:
     
  12. klpauba

    klpauba New Member

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    Most shop vacs rely on adequate air flow to cool the motor. If your bee vac restricts this flow of air, the motor might burn up. If yours doesn't already do so, you can regulate the amount of "make up" air by putting a wye between the hose and the vac and put a slide valve that controls the amount of make up air to use.

    I don't know if this will render right but here's a simple schematic:

    vac
    |
    |
    |
    +----- hose
    |
    = slide valve


    l8r
     
  13. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    perry very cool photos :coolphotos:!

    perry said: "First sign of trouble with this vac and it goes back and I want my $$ back."
    just don't tell them you are sucking up bees with it......:rotfl:
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Actually, if I was to be honest, I wasn't using the vac to suck up bees. The bee-vac did that, the shop vac was merely providing the low pressure (or vacuum) to make it work! :wink:
     
  15. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Looks like you did a good job there Perry!!

    I have run my bee vac continuously for 3, 4, 5 hours on a 100 foot 12 ga. cord. Motor has not given any trouble so far (knocking on wood now). On some cut outs have had to turn it off just because the cord was getting too hot. When the vac is not running I immediately open up the top to give them air, and most times dribble water over the screen for them to drink and fan. Next one you do open the top and wait a few minutes, then put your hand on top of the screen to feel how much heat is coming off of the top of them.

    Good job for sure.
     
  16. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Looked back and could not find the word honey anywhere Efmesch. I did mispell nectar once though! :oops:
    All the comb went into a bucket, Paul grabbed some pieces with nectar and was chewing away last I saw him. :lol:
    The rest I'll let some bees clean up and then toss the wax into a melter (once I get a new one made, the old one was rotten and didn't make the trip with us.) :sad:
     
  17. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Job well done. Congratulations Perry.:thumbsup:
     
  18. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

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    Looks like a nice little bundle of bees, and not nearly as tough to get to as it could have been. And better to discover the faulty vac on this job, rather than some nasty situation where it really leaves you stuck.

    A nice little acquisition.

    Adam
     
  19. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    ""Iddee, I followed your link and discovered that you keep busy on more than just one forum. Where do you find the time?""


    Ef, what little I know can be written in several places in a short time. Doesn't take long at all.
     
  20. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Well, an update to this cut-out.
    Yesterday I went to the adopted parents of this colony.
    A family in the next town have allowed me to use a large acreage they have for a bee yard if I keep a hive at their town yard and show them the inside workings of a beehive. They have a 9 year old daughter that is very curious about bees, and even a couple of stings when the hive was unloaded at night have not dissuaded her :thumbsup:.

    Anyway, all suited up and the young lady and her Mom and I opened up this cut-out colony. The bottom box was virtually empty of bees. The second deep had all the bees and early on I spotted emergency or supercedure cells being built (not capped). I was thinking that oh,oh, she didn't survive the move and now this colony was hopelessly queenless, what with the time elapsed between the move and now. I did come across three frames with lots of capped brood and larvae but could only find a few eggs despite carefully checking. I never did find the queen despite going back through it 3 times so I am convinced she is gone. I wonder why they had a queen with a beautiful pattern and everything seems to be going well and then she disappears? I have read a couple other threads on this very subject recently.
    The other thing I will have to do is move another hive to this spot as I only spotted about a half dozen drones in this colony with the cells.