Your favorite bee plants

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by efmesch, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    ben's writes:
    I also like dandelions because they give the bees their first real dose of natural pollen

    tecumseh:
    the species here would be elm and spring beauties. the latter species is appropriately named since it blooms first thing in the spring... due to it very small size is almost unnoticed as an individual plant but in some years (like this one) paints the yards in a white/lavender frost. some yards this year look almost like it has snowed lightly.

    dandelions are just now showing up...
     
  2. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Definitely a latitude issue here. I love to see the maple flowers come out, but it's generally still to cold for bees to be flying up here! A waste of good flowers.
     

  3. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    This is my opinion....there needs to be a book on bee forage....a book just for bee forage....one that tells the names an nick names, ranges an times of blooms, planted or natural and what good it does for the bees....ive seen sand pine on the list of blooming flowers for pollen but i was told it has zip in value for the bees....groundsle tree is not on the list an the bees cant get enuff of it an its everywhere in late summer....we def need a book....its time for me to break out the camera again an start work on the plants section of this fourm.
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Veronica sure looks like what I call Salvia - which I have seed for, and which tolerates Texas heat, and blooms all summer. Related?
     
  5. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    When my wife's basil is blooming, the bees hit it like its their last meal. Thinking about planting a bunch of it and just letting it go for the bees.
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've been told to order borage - haven't done it yet - has anyone tried it, does it start as seed or plant, and is it too late to plant it?
     
  7. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Borage grows very easily from seed. It also drops seed and self multiplies.
    Some days the bees are not that interested in it- if they have better things to do. other days the blue flowers are busy with bees all day long. So pretty!
    Don't be afraid to cut the stems back, as they can get so big and heavcy that they will break. The plant springs right back after being cut. Here in the north it dies over winter. Here's photos I took of my borage:
    borage seedlings:
    [​IMG]

    Flowering:
    [​IMG]

    Borage plants in the foreground of the garden:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Bem writes: Veronica.

    I went to that link, is that some sort of relation to a lupin? We have lupins growing all over the place up here, like a weed, but I have never seen a bee on them.
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    SUGGESTION,
    (Some of you have already done this on your own)
    If you can provide the scientific name for the plants you are referring to, it makes it a lot easier for all of us from different locations.
    Scientific names are one to a species, common names are "wanderers" and can go from one plant to another not only in different locations, but even from one neighbor to the next.
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    To me it looks like salvia - lupins won't really grow much in Texas, too hot. Bees DO like salvia, during the heat and dearth it was one of the few plants still in bloom.

    Looking up latin names: do you know my Ferry-Morse seed package does NOT contain the latin name. Working on it.

    Salvia is a member of the sage family, which apparently is a member of the mint family, so I'm thinking the bees love the whole bunch. I have sage (salvia officinialis) which blooms purple, I have oregano which blooms white and the bees adore it, I have red salvia (salvia splendens) which returns every year in the shade of my pine tree, and I have seeds for Salvia Blue Bedder from Ferry Morse, scientific name unknown, but you get my drift. i don't think these are Veronica, but what in the heck is veronica?
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  12. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    i'll try Em.....sometimes its hard to find out what some things are here....for the same reason your talking about....i'll ask an oldtimer what a plant is an he'll tell me what it is....but thats what he calls it an not always the correct name in the book....then also i can sometimes find the same plant in 2 books with diffrent names....then i dont know which one it is....capeweed for example is in the florida wildflower book as ''capeweed'' so i took pics of it an put it in the plant ID part of this fourm....then a while later i came across it in another book with a diffrent name....there is alot of that going on....we had a problem with moon flowers like that....boneset an thoroughwart are two givin names for the same plant...then to make it worse there is '' late flowering boneset AND late flowering thoroughwart'' 4 names for 2 plants...or 2 names for 4 plants....im still not sure....lol
     
  13. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Kooldad--you're proving my point. I agree, it's not always easy to find the scientific name--they're in Latin and always have at least two parts (the genus and the species). Usually they sound real wierd. :roll:
    Don't let it bother you too much--It was only a suggestion. If you can do it, fine, if not, we'll understand that you had good intentions but couldn't dig it up. :)
     
  14. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    to be honest Em the hardest part is the pictures in the books....i dont know who takes them but they need to turn in their camera to the nearist photographer an sign a waver never to pick up a camera again...EVER....I would have no trouble identifying plants with good pics to go by....then the latin names would be easy to find....it took me months to find ''late flowering thoroughwart'' anyplace.....its not in my books
     
  15. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

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    Echium, Borage, Purple Tansy, Salvia, Anise Hyssop, Maple, Locust, dandilion, goldenrod - all awesome.

    But the one that gets me most excited is the crocus - to see it poking up in sunny spots is the first real crack in the winter's ice...

    Adam
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    Sweetclover,dandilions,maples, willows,vitex, buckwheat, dutch clover, blackberries, and sumac in my area. One thing i find intresting is, plants like boneset,ironweed, and goldenrod that some of you have mentioned that the bees work,but in my location, you rarely if ever see a honeybee on them. :confused: Jack
     
  17. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    thats because there is more than one kind....there are several kinds of goldenrod here in florida....once again EM's latin names would help out here....the goldenrod that looks like the flower on a cornstalk is the one the bees like here...its also the last one to bloom...you'll see goldenrod for a month or more with not a bee on it....every other kind of polinator will use it but the bees....then all the sudden the right kind blooms (which looks kinda like the other) an the bees are on it bigtime.

    i suspect that because some plants are so similar that people dont actualy know what they are looking at....if i were to discribe boneset to you over the cell phone as you were standing in front of late flowering boneset....unless i said the leaves were right next to the stalk instead of on a short stem you would not know we were talking about a diffrent plant....an plant books are incompleat with some sorry pics in them...not to mention some scientific discriptions that confuse people that dont know what they mean.

    i am having to relearn alot of plants since i started keeping bees...sometimes i wanna give up trying...like with asters....i have 3 diffrent kinds, maybe 4 on my property...in my florida wildflower book it has one....a bush aster....thats nice...they are all on bushes in my pasture...they are all diffrent shades of purple...they are all diffrent sizes with only slightly diffrent leaves...but as a whole standing back from them look much diffrent....sighhhhhhhh
     
  18. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I try to keep up with plant ID, but there are just so many varieties of goldenrod and aster, that I remember only a few unusual ones and all the rest just get lumped together as "goldenrod" or "aster".
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hardy oxalis blooms much of the year, blooming now, blooms even in August, and a friend swears it brings bees to his garden. Wouldn't know where to buy it these days, I've had it for 20 years, just keep dividing.

    This page has Oxalis, but I've had a couple of these, and they die out too easily in the heat. The hardy stuff, it just lives. Hard freezes and heat waves...

    http://www.easytogrowbulbs.com/c-176-ox ... tgodsGceOA
     
  20. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    adam writes..
    Echium, Borage, Purple Tansy, Salvia, Anise Hyssop, Maple, Locust, dandilion, goldenrod - all awesome.

    and then Jack writes:
    Sweetclover,dandilions,maples, willows,vitex, buckwheat, dutch clover, blackberries, and sumac in my area. One thing i find intresting is, plants like boneset,ironweed, and goldenrod

    tecumseh...
    you are suppose to pick just one and not a half dozen or a list that takes up half a page.

    15 yard penalty and loss of down for both you guys...