Zombie Bee's

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Yankee11, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    I just read this and here is another link:
    http://news.yahoo.com/washington-states-first-zombie-bees-reported-184353539.html
     

  2. timekeepsgoing

    timekeepsgoing New Member

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  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If it's not one pest, it's another--or even worse, a whole slew of them at the same time.
     
  4. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    http://orsba.proboards.com/index.cg...mentpage&board=general&thread=3091&post=16793 I just started reading about this on the Oregon board.I found some of these bastags in one of my hives last spring.I thought they were some kind of maggot.My queen was still alive and maybe 200 workers.I put them in a nuc. and they survived, and made honey this year.
    http://www.zombeewatch.org/ Read this link so your not ignorant like me.Now that I know what to look for I'll keep my eyes open.:shock: http://www.zombeewatch.org/tutorial
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    JB, Thanks for making the effort to find and post those links. Information like this is very important for all of us.
     
  6. danskfarms

    danskfarms New Member

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  7. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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  8. Ray

    Ray Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocephalus_borealisApocephalus borealis is a species of North American parasitoid phorid fly that parasitizes bumblebees, honey bees and paper wasps. These flies are colloquially known as zombie flies and the bees they infect are colloquially known as zombees.[2] The association with honey bees has so far only been documented from California, South Dakota, Oregon, and Washington;[3] elsewhere, they are primarily associated with bumblebees and paper wasps, but most recently this species has changed host and has begun to attack the European honey bee.
    The infection of European honey bees in North America by Apocephalus borealis was first discovered by Dr. John Hafernik,
    ​So, this is a NATIVE specie that has decided to add the non-native honeybee to its prey specie.

    http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/dominulus-or-european-paper-wasp
    Before 1981, the European paper wasp was not recorded in North America. In its native region, P. dominula is the most abundant paper wasp in those countries around the Mediterranean. It is also found in southern Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East, and eastward into China.
    A highly successful colonizer, this wasp has rapidly increased its distribution in the United States during the past 20 years

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polistes_fuscatus
    Polistes fuscatus, common name northern paper wasp or golden paper wasp, is a species of social paper wasps belonging to the family Vespidae.
    Polistes fuscatus can be found in temperate North America, from British Columbia and Quebec to Florida and West Virginia.[2][3][4] It is the native "paper wasp" most common in the American Midwest. This species is mainly present in woodlands because the wasps require wood to construct their nests. It is also quite common to find P. fuscatus around human habitations.[2][3]
    I noticed a different paper wasp that seemed to be, supplanting the local variety. I didn't realize it was an invasive specie.

    Would building Bat houses help alleviate the problem?
     
  9. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Bats are mostly nocturnal. I don't think wasps fly at night.
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    wonderful. Did these larva have to be in a pool of water to successfully exit the bee, or would hot dry conditions work?
     
  11. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Oops; should have added this to my reply, to this post.

    http://www.zombeewatch.org/
    "Fly-parasitized honey bees become "ZomBees" showing the "zombie-like behavior" of leaving their hives at night on "a flight of the living dead."

     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I found that one. I have seen a walker or 2 in daylight outside my hives, that is how I saw the dwv that alerted me to mites.I will be putting bees in jars as I see walkers from now on. And I will see what is going on