Zuchini problems

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by PerryBee, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    We planted zucchini and we have two plants that are producing. The problem we are having is that 80% of the time the zucchini starts and then the ends turn yellow and mushy and die off. Normally we have enough harvest off two plants that we are giving some away but we don't even have enough for ourselves. Now, one plant is starting to wither like it is starved for water (it's not).
    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I don't know about Zucchini, I do know in Tomatoes this is called blossom end rot and is caused by a lack of calcium in the soil. My bet is you have some sort of deficiency whre the squash are concerned.
     

  3. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    Oddly enough, you may not have pollinators finding the field. male and female flowers need to "get together".

    Tell your bees where the plants are and ask for their help.
     
  4. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    There are beetles that attack zuchini (like the cucumber beetle) that enters the stem and kills the plant. this may be the problem. Jack
     
  6. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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  7. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I'd check for the nefarious borers. They will make a tiny hole, crawl inside the stem to the fruit, and ruin your day, and you can't see it until it is too late.

    If you find this, dispose (do not compost) the vines, and plant your squash somewhere else next year, well away from this location.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I think it's the lack of calcium, the description fits in perfectly. I don't see any sign of the borers. (pretty disgusting looking insects, not at all as nice the honey bee) :grin:

    Thanks for the help folks! :thumbsup:
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Anyone ever see the wasp that lays eggs in the soil around your seedlings and their larva enter the zucchini vine below ground and hollow it out from the inside?

    Never mind, it's the squash vine borer, henceforth to be known as the nefarious borer.

    I think I put flour or sevin dust on top of the soil around my squash one year. Also helps to not overwater during germination and early sprouting season, the critters can't lay their eggs through a clay crust.

    My squash did produce this year, but I pulled the last a week ago due to borers. Last year I had yellow squash all the way to October... Wish I could remember how.
     
  10. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I had the "poor soil" blossom end rot issue with tomatoes last year. A load of compost and manure last fall seems to have fixed it.

    Spent yesterday evening chasing hordes of those gray squash bugs all over my yellow summer squash plants. And some stripey beetle-looking things. Luckily the plants seem to be healthy enough to still produce despite the infestation. For now.
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I quit planting zucchini and pumkins because of that gray squash bug (about 1/2 to 3/4 in. long),I couldn't find anything on the market that controls or kill them. Once they have a hatch they multiply by the thousands and will attack and eat everything in your garden. The zucchini is the first to go, (it seems to draw them in) any of you know how to control them other than squash them between your finger and thumb? Jack
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    catch them before they lay eggs, needlenose pliers. I encourage birds in my garden and they keep those in check pretty well. (picking tomatoes early is a good thing, btw)
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Gypsi, your right. My uncle use to plant zucchini at the ends of his watermelon and cantalope rows (about 3 acres), he would lay a board under the zucchini plants and would check under them every 2 or 3 days, he said they would be hung up like dogs and he would mash them. He never had a problem with them taking over his patch, I tried it, and it worked, but sometimes i'd forget to ran my traps. :roll: Well you can guess what happened.:sad: Jack
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    A board under them? Neat idea. I just would look about 11 am when the plants were young and strong, and check right around the base of the one that looked wilty, that would be where the squashbug would be.
     
  15. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I've read that guinea hens will also eat the squash bugs, without pecking the squash like chickens do.

    My squash plants are looking worse, and the infestation is spreading. Argh! Gotta remember the board thing next time.
     
  16. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd just pull them up and turn the chickens or guineas loose in that part of the garden. a mobile pen (with roof) is a wonderful thing!